A Travellerspoint blog

USA

Two Lighthouses and an Aborted Trip to Little Washington

Driving by our old house in Norfolk


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2011 Back to Back Enchantment of the Seas and Lighthousing Driving South & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

My sister had bought a week at a condo in Key West at a charity auction. She wanted us to visit her in Key West and since I had a new car for the first time in 30 years, we were driving down. On the way, we were visiting grandchildren, cemeteries and lighthouses. The first lighthouse was the Assateague Lighthouse.
Assateague Lighthouse

Assateague Lighthouse

Getting Ready

Bob was packed a week in advance for the trip. I started thinking about packing on Saturday and got one suitcase packed Sunday and the other one done Monday February 14th

Tuesday 15 February 2011

We went to the new Italian restaurant over in Wildewood with the Hewins for trivia.
5018206-Sign_over_the_door_Wildewood.jpgSign over the door and inside of the restaurant

Sign over the door and inside of the restaurant


At the restaurant, the serving people were overwhelmed by the new rush of people

Chinese clam (shells - I've eaten the clams)

Chinese clam (shells - I've eaten the clams)

Calzone Ripieno Al Forno $10.00

Calzone Ripieno Al Forno $10.00

Crab cake (sandwich without sandwich)

Crab cake (sandwich without sandwich)


and the food wasn't all that good. It also gave me heartburn and I've had some intestinal discomfort since then.

We came in 2nd and won a bottle of wine which we insisted that the Hewins' take as we do not drink. We also gave them the fresh food in the fridge, although I think Bob forgot to give them the cut celery and also we had one of the fruit boxes left.

Wednesday 16 February 2011

Weds morning we did the morning chores and unplugged the modem, and TVs and turned off the water and left about 9. We got gas at BJs and the car has only been getting a little over 28 mph. The GPS was taking a really long time calculating the route.
Our new GPS

Our new GPS


At some point I figured out that I had it set on the most economical route which seems to mean the shortest and less high speed highways, so I changed it. We were in Prince Frederick by 10 and were going over the Bay Bridge before 11.

Chesapeake Bay Bridge toll booth

Chesapeake Bay Bridge toll booth

I was reading the AAA book and it said that there were lighthouse tours and gave a number to call. So I called. After going through the phone tree four times, I got the number they gave at the end written down (twice I didn't get that far before I picked). They said lighthouse tours didn't start until April, and she also said she didn't think that the National Seashore southern visitor's center was open except on weekends.

Arby's Reuben for lunch

Arby's Reuben for lunch

I decided to stop in Cambridge at a restaurant that the AAA book said overlooked the river, but it turned out to be on the grounds of a big hotel, and we couldn't find it. So we ate at Arby's because when I was working the Eastern Shore the Arby's in Cambridge and Salisbury had frozen custard, which was yummy. But they don't have it anymore. I had a Reuben and a chocolate turnover

Chocolate turnover

Chocolate turnover

in which the chocolate was warm and so I ended up with some on my face. Lunch took us about half an hour.
Car advertising Girl Scout Cookies

Car advertising Girl Scout Cookies


On the road a car passed and initially I thought it had "Go Hokies" written on the rear window. That would have been a little odd, but what it actually said was "G S Cookies"

Then about 1:30, a fire engine passed us
100_8154.JPGRumble strips

Rumble strips


and then everything on the road stopped. There had been an accident and they had wreckers
Wrecker with wrecked car

Wrecker with wrecked car


and they airlifted the victims out by helicopter. That took about 10 minutes.

We got to the Virginia border about 2
e5b619e0-d5f2-11ea-a443-65fd0aea1139.JPGBerries at Virginia  welcome station

Berries at Virginia welcome station


and we got maps (Virginia, Chincoteague, National Seashore, etc)

We arrived on Chincoteague (which the GPS pronounced Chincoty or something like that) at 1424
5857563-Island_Access_Chincoteague.jpg5857564-Island_Access_Chincoteague.jpg
A new 3/4-mile (4,035-foot) bridge has been built over Black Narrows and Lewis Creek Channel. The bridge provides motorists with better access to the Town of Chincoteague. A 729-foot connector bridge will be built linking the new bridge to Marsh Island.

The new bridge maintains a single lane of traffic in each direction, divided by a double line.
869324685857554-New_Bridge_t..gue_Island.jpgNew Bridge to Chincoteague

New Bridge to Chincoteague


I decided to check out the southern visitor's center first, so we crossed the bridge to Assateague Island
Empty entrance kiosk

Empty entrance kiosk


And the Tom Cove Visitor's Center was indeed closed. We took a couple photos of the lighthouse from there.196950095857532-Lighthouse_f..incoteague.jpgLighthouse from the Wildlife Refuge

Lighthouse from the Wildlife Refuge


Boardwalk to Toms Cove Visitor's center

Boardwalk to Toms Cove Visitor's center

Scrub trees at the closed National Park visitor's Center for the National Seashore

Scrub trees at the closed National Park visitor's Center for the National Seashore


5020022-Assateague_Light_Chincoteague.jpgLighthouse from Assateague

Lighthouse from Assateague


We looked at the beach, but I was saving my energy for the walk to the lighthouse and didn't go out on it.
Assateague Island National Seashore

Assateague Island National Seashore

Assateague Beach

Assateague Beach

366197815070741-More_beach_C..ife_Refuge.jpgMore beach from the car

More beach from the car


Didn't see any ponies because, most of the time they stay up on the Maryland end of the island. There are no wild ponies on Chincoteague Island itself - just on Assateague. The only time there are ponies on Chincoteague is after the Pony Swim. At “slack tide” on the last Wednesday of every July, Chincoteague's “Saltwater Cowboys” herd about 150 ponies across the Assateague Channel to move them from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island.

We took some photos of the birds in the wildlife refuge.
5857556-Wildlife_refuge_Chincoteague_Island.jpgFemale mallards in the wildlife refuge

Female mallards in the wildlife refuge


Lighthouse, a Swan and Snow Geese?

Lighthouse, a Swan and Snow Geese?


There were supposed to be snow geese, and there were white birds but they were too far away for me to see whether they were geese or swans.
5857515-marshes_Chincoteague.jpgbeach marsh and birds

beach marsh and birds


Great blue heron - fishing

Great blue heron - fishing

We got to the lighthouse trail and did walk to it although it took just about every energy unit I had.
Top of the lighthouse from the trail to parking

Top of the lighthouse from the trail to parking


Although one might expect that the lighthouse itself would not be handicapped accessible - after all the design of the thing means that there will usually be many steps to get to the top. Even the Sullivan's Island lighthouse which is the only one with an elevator has an additional 25 foot ladder to be scaled to get to the lantern room.
Picture at the first rest place

Picture at the first rest place


But the path to this lighthouse is particularly difficult to negotiate if you have trouble walking. It is deep gravel.Bob said it looked new. You could not use a scooter or wheelchair, and even walking was difficult for me. I had to stop and rest several times.
Birdhouse

Birdhouse


These photos are the ones I took while I stopped to rest.
Closer now but tree branches in the way

Closer now but tree branches in the way


Entrance sign - almost there

Entrance sign - almost there


This is as close as I got

This is as close as I got


I got up to the cleared area around the lighthouse, and sat down to catch my breath.
Taken sitting on my cane

Taken sitting on my cane


Bob went up to the lighthouse and took photos of the signs
Bob walking around the base of the lighthouse

Bob walking around the base of the lighthouse

Sign about the lighthouse

Sign about the lighthouse


The original lighthouse was constructed here in 1833 In 1860, construction on a taller, more powerfully illuminated brick lighthouse began, and was completed in 1867.
Assateague Village sign

Assateague Village sign


Assateague's lighthouse has twin rotating lights that flash one after the other from a height of 154 feet above sea level. The lights can be seen 19 miles out to sea.
Assateague Light

Assateague Light


A new brick oil house, measuring fourteen by eighteen feet, was added to the station in 1891,
Oil house

Oil house


and in 1907, ruby-red glass was placed in a portion of the lantern room to create a red sector in the light. In 1910, a concrete bungalow was built at the lighthouse for Keeper William Collins, who was responsible for the beacon light at Fishing Point in Tom’s Cove. The lighthouse, an oil house, and the bungalow are the only structures from the station that remain standing today.
5857980-base_of_the_tower_Chincoteague.jpgBottom of the lighthouse

Bottom of the lighthouse


This dwelling is located south of the tower and is used to house staff for the wildlife refuge. (We didn't take any photos of the house) Coastal lighthouses are frequently threatened by the encroaching sea, but at Assateague Island, the opposite is actually true. The southern tip of the island, known as Tom’s Cove Hook, is slowly being built up by vast amounts of sand deposited by ocean currents.
Island on the move

Island on the move


Most of the Hook did not even exist before the twentieth century, and now the lighthouse stands much farther from the inlet to Chincoteague Bay.
Map of Tom's Hook

Map of Tom's Hook


In 2006 he lighthouse started to be renovated and it was completed in 2013 after our visit.
Still shining

Still shining


The 150th anniversary of the lighthouse was celebrated in October 2017.

On the way back toward the hotel
Near the Wildlife Refuge Entrance

Near the Wildlife Refuge Entrance


we passed the museum (closed).
Museum (closed off season)

Museum (closed off season)


The museum has the original fresnel lens from the Assateague Island Lighthouse. (Fresnel is pronounced Fre-nell - the S is silent) and we saw the McDonalds where we could see the lighthouse, but I thought we would come back for that later. I was trying to find a couple of cemeteries to see if I had located them on the map correctly.
Main Street

Main Street


But we turned the wrong way on Main St and went up to the other end and had to turn around.
5035675-Street_in_Chincoteaque_Chincoteague.jpgRoad in Chincoteague with our GPS map

Road in Chincoteague with our GPS map


We got to the hotel about 1530.
Pony logo in the entrance of the Hampton Inn

Pony logo in the entrance of the Hampton Inn


They seemed genuinely to want us to have a good stay. Unlike a lot of Hampton Inns, this one has a heated indoor pool (which we did not get a chance to try). They gave us cookies and said there was tea and coffee anytime.
5070512-Bed_Chincoteague_Island.jpgMicrowave and fridge

Microwave and fridge


There is a fridge and microwave in the room. They also said they were serving a snack supper between 5 and 7.

I downloaded the photos we took (Bob took 11, I took 80) but I kept having to go into the bathroom to meditate. Next time I go I'm taking the phone book in there to read. Bob wasn't enthusiastic about the supper
5035694-Dinner_at_the_hotel_Chincoteague.jpgDinner

Dinner


which was soup, chips, cold cut sandwiches and drinks. But I didn't think I could get that far from the bathroom, so in the end that was what we did

Thursday 17 February 2011

Bob set the alarm for 7 and we got up a little after that. Went to breakfast about 8:20.
5019158-TV_in_breakfast_room_Chincoteague.jpgTV and painting in the breakfast room

TV and painting in the breakfast room

Bob at breakfast

Bob at breakfast


In addition to waffles and cranberry juice they had scrambled eggs, sausage, hard boiled eggs, hot and cold cereal, pastries, toast, tea and coffee.
My breakfast

My breakfast


We ate at a table by the window overlooking the canal. It was posted no swimming because of swift currents.
904006915070514-Another_view..gue_Island.jpgViews from the window at breakfast

Views from the window at breakfast


I saw ducks flocking to where someone was apparently feeding them,
486631865070510-Ducks_in_the..incoteague.jpgDucks in the canal

Ducks in the canal


and then they all swam down a canal in a phalanx.
Phalanx of ducks swimming down the canal

Phalanx of ducks swimming down the canal


We checked out, about 8:50, but when I got to the car I couldn't remember where I had put the GPS. Finally figured it out after emptying my whole computer bag. I had stuck it and my cell phone in the side bottle slot. Anyway we did to go the McDonalds and
McDonalds from the street

McDonalds from the street


and take pictures of the lighthouse.
Lighthouse from the back of the McD's parking lot

Lighthouse from the back of the McD's parking lot


Then we drove the length of Main Street, touring the Historic Downtown.
Visit our Historic Downtown sign

Visit our Historic Downtown sign


But there did not appear to be any organized route to follow or any type of pamphlet with information on what to look at that would detail the history. The Fire Department and the Library are listed as historic buildings. The original Library building was once a barber shop.
Movie theater (left) and library (right)

Movie theater (left) and library (right)

Laundromat next to decoy shop and T-shirt factory

Laundromat next to decoy shop and T-shirt factory


5857586-Shops_on_Main_Street_Chincoteague.jpgShops and Gas station on Main Street

Shops and Gas station on Main Street


Bridge to the mainland

Bridge to the mainland


We left the island over the new drawbridge and drove to US 13. We missed seeing the gas that was $2.99 (or else they upped the price since last night), so we stopped when we saw some that was $3.059.
Gas station (blurred because camera was slow)

Gas station (blurred because camera was slow)


The car is getting 34+mpg. We have seen two Roses department stores over here, and several Walmarts that are painted cream color and not grey. We also saw a Peebles department store - we used to have one of them where we live.

Next looking for the Cape Charles Light in the Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge.

I had put the GPS location for the Cape Charles Lighthouse on Smith Island into the GPS. That took us into the Eastern Shore of Virginia Wildlife Refuge
Bridges over Fisherman's Inlet

Bridges over Fisherman's Inlet

Entrance to the wildlife refuge

Entrance to the wildlife refuge


to the Wise Boat Ramp. The refuge information says that the Wise Point Boat Ramp on the Inside Virginia Passage provides access to the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay for fishing, hunting, wildlife observation and photography.
Parking lot at the boat ramp

Parking lot at the boat ramp


Bulletin Board at the boat ramp - Smith Island Closed

Bulletin Board at the boat ramp - Smith Island Closed

General Ramp Rules and Regulations:

Day use area only (no overnight parking)
A pass is required for parking and/or launching (must be displayed from your rearview mirror)
Launching or loading is limited to 20 minutes
Parking is allowed in marked spaces only
Prohibited activities include:
Use or display of alcoholic beverages
Pets (even in vehicles)
Personal watercraft (Jet Ski, etc.)
Fishing or crabbing along the shore or ramp
Cleaning, gutting or disposal of fish or bait
Swimming or wading
Kite boarding or wind surfing
Vehicles or trailers exceeding 8.5 feet in width or 45 feet in length when coupled
Mooring at or walking on the commercial boat dock
Being present in the area outside hours of operation

Reminder:

Due to the critical nature of their habitats for wildlife, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge and Skidmore Island (part of the Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge) are closed to the public. Trespassing (including boat landing or walking on the beach) is prohibited.
Signs at the Boat Landing

Signs at the Boat Landing

Sign at the Boat Ramp

Sign at the Boat Ramp

Ramp from the water Photo Credit: USFWS

Ramp from the water Photo Credit: USFWS


The GPS then told us to start off road navigation. We did not have our boat with us in February :), and our boat wouldn't be suitable for use at this location anyway.

We looked but couldn't see the lighthouse.

There were men all over the Refuge wearing orange vests with poles with a little white disk in top.
Man with pole on the right side as we pass

Man with pole on the right side as we pass


I went back to the Refuge administration building. The man I talked to said the guys with the disk at the top of the poles were surveying the roads - they use GPS for that now. He said that there was a tree covered island in the way of seeing the lighthouse from the refuge. He showed me on a map where the lighthouse was.
Map of the refuge - cemetery in inset

Map of the refuge - cemetery in inset


He said the only place you could see it from land was the northbound lane of the Bridge Tunnel. There was a stuffed snow goose on the top of a bookcase so I took a photo of it.
Snow Goose - middle bird

Snow Goose - middle bird

There was a historic cemetery on the map, so we drove to the parking area and walked down to it. First we passed a WWII bunker of Fort John Custis. At the beginning of World War II, a lot of the land that is now part of the wildlife refuge was acquired by the federal government and named Fort John Custis, after a prominent eighteenth century resident of Northampton County. Large bunkers in the fort housed 16-inch guns designed to protect naval bases and shipyards in Hampton Roads. There were approximately 800 soldiers who defended the Bay entrance. The Fort also served as a logistical support base for east coast prisoners of war

In 1950, the U.S. Air Force changed the name of Fort John Custis to the Cape Charles Air Force Station. The Air Force occupied their AFS until 1981.
Sign at bunker

Sign at bunker


Bunker behind information kiosk

Bunker behind information kiosk

Stairs to the top of the bunker

Stairs to the top of the bunker


and then Bob climbed to the top of the bunker. He got a (better) picture of a vulture in the top of a tree, but he said you really couldn't see much.
932573665036500-My_picture_o..ife_Refuge.jpgMy photo and Bob's photo of the Vulture at the top of a tree

My photo and Bob's photo of the Vulture at the top of a tree


Then we went to the Historic Hallett Cemetery and took photos of the markers.
Cemetery in the winter

Cemetery in the winter


This cemetery is on the property of the Eastern Shore of VA National Wildlife Refuge in an area that was Fort Custis on the Old Douglas Fitchett Farm.
639305615840503-J_D_Hallett_..ife_Refuge.jpgJ. D.  and Thomas Hallett's stones

J. D. and Thomas Hallett's stones


Thomas Hallett and Tamar Trower
Inscription on Tamar Hallet's stone

Inscription on Tamar Hallet's stone


had five children - Arinthea Hallett, Sarah Hallett , James Hallett , Thomas J Hallett and Margaret Ellen Hallett. Thomas, Tamar and three of their children (James,
Sarah Hallett

Sarah Hallett


Sarah and Maggie) are buried in this cemetery. Maggie married Leonard Thomas Fitchett and they had eight children, including Hilary G Fitchett. One of Hillary's children, Rufus Carl who died at age two is also buried here.
[185602125036497-Grave_of_a_l..ife_Refuge.jpgMemorial of the Fitchett boy who died at age two

Memorial of the Fitchett boy who died at age two

We didn't go as far as the marsh overlook
Trail near parking lot

Trail near parking lot


Butterfly trail (for summer) in main refuge

Butterfly trail (for summer) in main refuge

456841965840488-Another_info..ife_Refuge.jpgInformation about wildlife

Information about wildlife

Sign which says "Public Hunting area

Sign which says "Public Hunting area


The refuge permits deer hunting - the harvest of animals is one tool used to manage wildlife populations at a level compatible with the environment

We were approaching the Bridge Tunnel by 11:40 ($12 toll),
Approaching the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel

Approaching the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel


Toll has been paid

Toll has been paid


and after we paid the toll, I could see the lighthouse far in the distance. I took some pictures out the back driver's side window, but they aren't terrific photos.
5020246-Visit_the_Lighthouse_Smith_Island.jpgLighthouse from the road

Lighthouse from the road


The Cape Charles lighthouse was built in 1895. It was still active in 2011 but it was made inactive in 2013. It consists of a 191 ft. octagonal pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with central cylinder, lantern and gallery, solar-powered 190 mm lens. The tower is painted white; the lantern and watch room are painted black. This is the second tallest U.S. lighthouse. It is located on uninhabited Smith Island, just north of the cape. Accessible only by boat.
Cape Charles Lighthouse from the Bridge-Tunnel

Cape Charles Lighthouse from the Bridge-Tunnel


Starting across the Bridge-Tunnel

Starting across the Bridge-Tunnel


Now we were on the way to Norfolk. There are two tunnels to the bridge tunnel.
One of the tunnels

One of the tunnels


The first one is the Chesapeake Channel Tunnel and the second one is called the Thimble Shoals tunnel. Apparently they have transponders of some type in the tunnels because the GPS did not lose track of us and knew how fast we were going.

Bob asked me if I wanted to eat lunch at the restaurant on Sea Gull Island right at the end of the Thimble Shoals tunnel. I thought we might be able to see Thimble Shoals light, but the restaurant is on the other side. A big 18 wheeler was tailgating us through the tunnel, and it is a very sharp turn off the road to get to the restaurant and I wasn't sure Bob was going to make it.
703904225841555-From_island_..d_Virginia.jpgFence at  southern end of 2nd tunnel

Fence at southern end of 2nd tunnel

Restaurant from the parking lot

Restaurant from the parking lot

Part of the menu

Part of the menu


We both had clam chowder (the traditional kind and not the Core Sound kind) and a BBQ sandwich
5036179-Clam_Chowder_Norfolk.jpgCup of Clam Chowder $4.00 and BBQ sandwich $8.00

Cup of Clam Chowder $4.00 and BBQ sandwich $8.00


We ate by the window
View from the window of the restaurant

View from the window of the restaurant

5841593-Signs_on_the_pier_Virginia.jpgSigns and Binoculars on the pier

Signs and Binoculars on the pier

Bird on the rocks below the restaurant

Bird on the rocks below the restaurant

Family on the pier

Family on the pier


We watched some of those Navy vehicles that are powered by a big fan in the back zipping around - I saw a man try to take a photo of them with his lens cap on. It didn't work
5036180-Navy_boat_Norfolk.jpgNavy boat and buoy

Navy boat and buoy

Navy boats

Navy boats


Me reflected in the ladies room mirror

Me reflected in the ladies room mirror


We drove along Little Creek
100_8297.JPGJoint Expeditionary Base - Little Creek-Fort Story

Joint Expeditionary Base - Little Creek-Fort Story


to our old house on Nathan Avenue.
Nathan Avenue - more trees than in 1961

Nathan Avenue - more trees than in 1961

8217 Nathan Avenue in 1961

8217 Nathan Avenue in 1961


They have removed all the azalea bushes and replaced them with grass. They took out the big evergreen Xmas tree that was in the front yard They have replaced the cream shingles with aluminum siding. They removed the metal awning that shaded the picture window and the house looks naked without it.
Then and Now

Then and Now


They even have aluminum siding on the car port supports. They've replaced the chain link fence with a big board fence. They have made the driveway a full double driveway instead of just two concrete strips and they've replaced the windows. There was a little dog inside that I think was a Llassa who barked at me, and the big truck in the driveway had a vanity plate "Doggy Mom" . But they still have the same steps and cheesy iron railing.
5036167-Driving_up_to_the_house_Norfolk.jpg8217 Nathan Avenue in 2011

8217 Nathan Avenue in 2011


When I looked through a chink in the fence, I saw a pool in the back yard and also several of what look like storage sheds and another building which could be a garage. I verified this with Google maps.
Fence

Fence


I knocked in a non-aggressive fashion on the door but nobody came - so we proceeded on to "Little Washington" Ever since I heard about "Little Washington" (which is the way North Carolinians refer to Washington North Carolina), I've wanted to see it. I got close this time, but saw very little
Visitor Information Center

Visitor Information Center


We stopped by the North Carolina Visitor's Center that is between the Dismal Swamp Canal and Route 17.
x100_7031.JPGReflections in the canal

Reflections in the canal

Civil War map

Civil War map


There is a bridge over the canal just past that point for the State Park. Bob walked over and took some pictures
Kayak launch

Kayak launch


I wanted to take the historic walking tour of Washington NC, but we were going to get there too late to get a map of the tour.

I called to see where it was and we were going to try it, but we didn't see where we were to turn to get to the town so we ended up going across a series of bridges which were not on the GPS maps.
Swamp

Swamp


The GPS did not say anything about what we were doing. We turned around and finally checked into the Comfort Inn about 1630. The hotel was comfortable although I did hear noise from other occupants from time to time. Our room had a microwave and dorm fridge in addition to two beds. They also had free wi-fi
x100_8327.JPGTV

TV

Bob reading the paper

Bob reading the paper


The bathroom had a separate sink area from the tub and shower, which was good, as Bob could be shaving and I could use the toilet without disturbing him. But the toilet was not seated properly and had one of those crappy plastic seats that they all seem to use now, so when I sat down, everything would shift under me.
Reflected in the bathroom mirror

Reflected in the bathroom mirror


We went out to the Golden Corral for dinner - at 1830 we were too late for the Early Bird,
100_8321.JPGDinner

Dinner

Dinner

Dinner


but we got the old person's discount.
Bob cleaning the windshield

Bob cleaning the windshield


Then we got gas on the way back to the motel - this time the car got 33+ mpg. I tried to take a picture of the bugs on the window when Bob was washing the window.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 12:11 Archived in USA Tagged park norfolk lighthouse refuge chincoteague assateague Comments (13)

Heading for the St. Mary's GA Sub Museum, Cumberland Island

On the way to the second Key West Visit


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2011 Back to Back Enchantment of the Seas and Lighthousing Driving South & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Friday 18 February 2011

The hotel had a nice breakfast in the morning which included waffles that you make yourself, pastries, hot and cold cereal, hard boiled eggs and juices including cranberry. (I had a waffle and a hard boiled egg and some Cheerios.) We checked out about 0835.
Highway leaving "Little Washington"

Highway leaving "Little Washington"


I had thought that we would take US 17 down to Summerville because that is shorter by about 30 miles. Bob assumed that of course we would go back over to I95. Had I known that, I would have made a reservation in a different place. Also if I had known that was what he wanted to do, I would have driven through the old part of town first.

We stopped for lunch at Friendlies at 11:35.
Friendly's inside

Friendly's inside


Bob had a cup of chili and a Fribble (their milkshake), and I had a
Friendly's BLT and a cup of applesauce

Friendly's BLT and a cup of applesauce


Happy Ending sundae which is the smallest sundae they have

Happy Ending sundae which is the smallest sundae they have



We stopped for gas (and for Bob to use the bathroom) at Santee about 1420
Hess gas

Hess gas


and the car was getting 35.3 mph on I-95. I remembered correctly that there was no place to get gas after we turned south toward Summerville.

I called my son after we left Santee and found that he was not expecting us because he thought we were going north to Maine. I had planned to go to Connecticut to see a granddaughter and then to Vermont to see a grandson in October (not in February), but that trip was scrapped. So we checked into the motel around 1510
Motel shower

Motel shower


and after we settled in, we drove over to our son's house. Our granddaughter was there with her mother and a friend of her brothers and we talked for awhile.
Samson

Samson


The store in Tortola sent the package that was to go to my son with his birthday present in it to me, and the package with gifts for everyone else to him. They wondered why I was sending them 5 bottles of ginger and 4 Christmas tree ornaments. I gave them the gifts we bought on the ship and gathered together the things that were sent to him by mistake.

Our grandson got home from track practice and we got to see his ferret Peaches. I have only one very blurry photo - she moves too fast to get a photo of her easily.
Grandson's ferret

Grandson's ferret


We met our son at Logan's Roadhouse for dinner.
Grandson, grandfather, son

Grandson, grandfather, son

Logan's Roadhouse is another franchise/chain restaurant operation. It was founded in 1991 and the home office is located in Nashville, TN.
fe52b5f0-d78f-11ea-917c-ffa6581796ef.jpgJukebox

Jukebox


in 2011, there were 124 restaurants in Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Michigan - Detroit Area, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia
Logan's Roadhouse

Logan's Roadhouse


It is supposed to be like a roadhouse from the 1930's and 1940's. I don't think of roadhouse with a positive image, but apparently Logan's has been very successful with this idea. They have TV sets in various corners, and a jukebox. There is a meat counter display case showing the various cuts of meat.
Meat showcase

Meat showcase


Looking at the menu

Looking at the menu


My son had a french dip sandwich (Roast beef, sauteed onions and mushrooms topped with melted Swiss cheese on a French roll; au jus for dipping, my husband had a Logan's Club Sandwich (Ham, turkey, bacon, lettuce, tomato, cheddar cheese and mayonnaise served on toasted bread), I had a
My steak

My steak

Apple cobbler with ice cream

Apple cobbler with ice cream


My grandchildren had kids meals.
unti2atled.jpg23481350-d790-11ea-917c-ffa6581796ef.JPG
We went back to the motel afterwards.

Saturday 19 February 2011 - Grandchildren and Grand-Pets

Our son called and said he had an appointment in the morning. He had suggested that we go to the Eastern South Carolina expo which he thought had something to do with boats, but which was really mostly on land activities outdoors, like hunting. They had Dock Dog competitions, and also hawk flying demonstrations. But the admission was $20 each and there were about 8 different locations which involved a lot more walking than I felt up to. So we decided against doing that.

My breakfast

My breakfast

We had breakfast at the hotel which was OK but they had no cranberry juice - just grapefruit juice. I tried to edit some photos, and then we had lunch at Chick-fil-A. We went in to eat.
Bob heading for lunch

Bob heading for lunch


There was a topiary cow and a lot of flowers outside.
Topiary cow

Topiary cow

100_8390.JPGFlowers outside Chik-fil-A

Flowers outside Chik-fil-A


Cows on the ceiling

Cows on the ceiling

c00c9350-d795-11ea-9256-9b53e6d0f640.JPGTable advert and Flowers on the tables

Table advert and Flowers on the tables


They had people taking the orders as the cars waited in line which made it much quicker.
Getting an order before you get to the speaker

Getting an order before you get to the speaker


Bob had

Chicken strips

Chicken strips

and I had
Sandwich

Sandwich

Shredded carrot salad

Shredded carrot salad

Total = $9.94

We went over to our son's after lunch. Our son cooked hamburgers and hotdogs on the grille and we had potato salad that our daughter-in-law had made.
Turtle in their aquarium

Turtle in their aquarium


Samson the cat

Samson the cat

100_8404.JPGCocoa and Merky the dogs

Cocoa and Merky the dogs

Granddaughter playing with the dogs

Granddaughter playing with the dogs


The weather was beautiful and we sat out on the porch. Our grandson took his motorcycle out for a spin.
Grandson on motorcycle

Grandson on motorcycle


We found out that our daughter-in-law starts work at a medical center in a week or so
Daughter-in-law

Daughter-in-law


and that my son was in a band called "Farmer Tan" and they have a regular gig on Monday nights. Our son sings, and his friend Mike plays the guitar and Mike's wife plays the bongos. Unfortunately we would not be able to stay and see the first night because I had made reservations back in October to go to St. Mary's GA on Sunday.
100_8412.JPGBonfire

Bonfire

Sunday 20 February 2011

I had a goal for today which was to visit the submarine museum in St. Mary's GA - we missed it last time we were here (in 2004) because Bob decided to leave early.
100_8420.JPGSummerville town square

Summerville town square


We got underway about 9. We went down US 17
Following Route 17

Following Route 17


through a place called Round O. We saw some wild turkeys by the road. The last place before we hit I-95 was Walterboro. I noticed several horse dealers in the area and also saw a sign advertising "concealed carry classes".
Georgia Welcome station

Georgia Welcome station


We stopped for lunch about noon just before we got to St. Mary's.
KFC

KFC


We ate at KFC and it was a very lively place with a lot of local people eating Sunday dinner there. Bob had
Three chicken strips

Three chicken strips


and I had
BBQ sandwich

BBQ sandwich

When we got to St. Mary's we parked and went to the museum. Bob was in the U.S. Navy submariner reserve in high school and the following year before he went to the U.S. Naval Academy. So on our re-visit, the first thing we visited was this museum.
44140311414298-From_across_..aint_Marys.jpgSubmarine museum - left 2004 - right 2011

Submarine museum - left 2004 - right 2011


St. Marys Submarine Museum is in a converted historic movie theater (built in 1911) on the St. Marys waterfront. They have a working periscope, models of torpedoes, many displays made from actual submarines
Hatch

Hatch

Control panel

Control panel

Bunk

Bunk


a deep-sea diving suit
Diving suit

Diving suit


and submarine uniforms, command plaques,
Wall of command plaques - The one on the left 2nd from the end is one we have because Bob served on that ship

Wall of command plaques - The one on the left 2nd from the end is one we have because Bob served on that ship


Close-up of U.S.S. Conger plaque - Sub that Bob served on

Close-up of U.S.S. Conger plaque - Sub that Bob served on


photographs and models of submarines, an area for watching movies on submarines, working sonar panels,
Display

Display


a history of submarines, a reading area, a reference area, gift shop and a display dedicated to the eight submariners who received the Medals of Honor. Bob is of the opinion that it needs a good organizing - it appears to be a collection of collections. It was fun though.
.
Then we checked into the Riverview Hotel We saw this hotel in 2004 when we were walking along the waterfront from the marina.
Bob reflected in the front window of the Riverview

Bob reflected in the front window of the Riverview


When we came back to go to Cumberland Island, we booked in this hotel because it was the closest to the Cumberland Island ferries and I could walk across the street to them. The Riverview Hotel was built 1916. This tabby coated 105 Osborne Street hotel boasts a two story porch along its Osborne Street elevation.
Riverview Hotel

Riverview Hotel


The hotel is clean and old. Not fancy old with bed flounces and lots of little pillows. It is just old. It has Mission Oak furniture and some of the stair carpet is worn. They have wi-fi which I can almost get in the room, but they also have a big staircase to climb every time we go up to our room. Definitely not handicapped accessible.
Upper hallway

Upper hallway


This historic hotel was built in 1916. The rooms have all been named after people who have either stayed at the Riverview Hotel or are locally famous. The rooms are named after people as varied as Admiral Nimitz and the weatherman Willard Scott. We stayed in the Talmadge room - named after Georgia Governor Eugene Talmadge. We had two iron bedsteads - brass bedstead types with quilts, but the metal is painted black.
Wardrobe/shrank with bed reflected and TV on top

Wardrobe/shrank with bed reflected and TV on top


There is a shrank for a closet and our own bathroom.
Through the bathroom door

Through the bathroom door


There are plantation shutters on the windows.
View from the hotel

View from the hotel


The Riverview Hotel is an official SSCA Cruising station and will receive mail & packages for cruisers. This would be important to us - except for the rules that Georgia has against living aboard a boat which means that we can't stay here on our boat for more than a month.

Amenities include air conditioning, daily maid service, cable TV, HBO + ESPN, and continental breakfast. Hairdryers, alarm clocks, and iron available upon request.

Canon on the town square

Canon on the town square


We saw a President's Day parade at the waterfront.
President's day flag bearers

President's day flag bearers


5036784-Presidents_Day_Parade_Saint_Marys.jpgPresident's Day parade

President's Day parade

Photographer

Photographer


Then we went over to the NPS headquarters and checked on our reservation.
Cumberland Lady ferry

Cumberland Lady ferry

Informational sign

Informational sign

and looked at the exhibits.
Turtle nest diorama

Turtle nest diorama


Oyster Catcher

Oyster Catcher


We were too late to get the trolley tour.
100_8473.JPGTrolley tours start here--last trolley tour leaving the waterfront

Trolley tours start here--last trolley tour leaving the waterfront


National Seashore offices in historic building

National Seashore offices in historic building


The new museum is on St. Mary's Street, right on the water. The NPS website says:"The exhibition uses pieces from the collection to highlight the people of the island. The lives of Native Americans, African Americans, the Carnegie family as well as others who lived on the island in the 19th and 20th centuries are seen in the island environment. The museum was designed to provide a glimpse of Cumberland Island to those who are unable to visit the island. These exhibits were funded through fees paid by island visitors and campers. A small portion of the total collection will be on display, primarily pieces that illustrate life on the barrier island.
Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum

Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum


“These are objects that have never before been on public display,” said curator John Mitchell. “We can learn from these items about how people lived in the past.”"

US Coast and Geodetic Survey Bench  Mark

US Coast and Geodetic Survey Bench Mark


Available Facilities Public restrooms and water fountain

Some confusion in museum names has developed between the Cumberland Island Museum and the Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum.The Cumberland Island Museum is a separate entity and was incorporated in 1985 to assure the protection and maintenance of the library, archival materials, and natural history collections of Carol Ruckdeschel and C. Robert Shoop. Unlike some museums, The Cumberland Island Museum does not have exhibits or displays, but simply houses and curates the research materials. It is on Cumberland Island. It is open to the public.
Riverside park

Riverside park

5841745-Another_street_scene_Saint_Marys.jpgCentral street with Market on the Square on right

Central street with Market on the Square on right

5841742-Market_on_the_Square_Saint_Marys.jpgMarket on the Square- They were having a sale

Market on the Square- They were having a sale


I thought we would eat at Langs (where we tried to eat before but they had too much of a wait)
Lang's is on the other side of the STOP sign

Lang's is on the other side of the STOP sign

Bob walking back across to tell me it was closed

Bob walking back across to tell me it was closed


but they are not open until Weds.

So we drove out to the Silver Star Steakhouse - built in 1890
5841729-Sign_in_the_window_Saint_Marys.jpgFront of the restaurant

Front of the restaurant

Boot as a planter by the door

Boot as a planter by the door


which used to be a grocery store.
Explanation on the menu

Explanation on the menu

Inside of the restaurant

Inside of the restaurant


I ordered an oyster po-boy, but there were out of oysters, so I had a fish sandwich instead.
Fish sandwich

Fish sandwich


Bob had a cup of crab bisque and fish and chips.
Bob's Fish and chips $9.99

Bob's Fish and chips $9.99


I brought home a key lime cheesecake but I couldn't find the plastic fork that I thought I had in my bag.
Night in St. Mary's

Night in St. Mary's


Later: The Key Lime Cheesecake was very good. I can't remember what I used to eat it with though.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:23 Archived in USA Tagged cat museum dogs turtle south_carolina submarines ice_cream ferret summerville Comments (2)

The Dungeness of Oglethorpe, Greene, and Carnegie

Historic St. Mary's Georgia


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2011 Back to Back Enchantment of the Seas and Lighthousing Driving South & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Monday 21 February 2011

Chart of Cumberland Island

Chart of Cumberland Island

Seven miles east of St. Mary's Georgia and just north of Amelia Island Florida, Cumberland Island is the largest and southernmost barrier island in the Georgia sea island chain. It is skirted on the east by an unbroken fringe of Atlantic coastal beach. Most of the island is included in the Cumberland Island National Seashore, but some of the people who had property on the island when it was made into a National Park retain the rights to live on the island for their lifetimes. We have been all around it by sea, but until 2011 we had never actually been to the island. We've come from Jekyll Island and gone out Brunswick Inlet into St. Andrews Sound (top of the chart) and come around it and come in the St. Mary's Inlet. (bottom of the chart). And then when we were coming north 3 or 4 months later, we've come from Fernandina up Cumberland Sound past Kings Bay Submarine Base and up the Cumberland River to Jekyll Island in the Intercoastal Waterway

It is accessible by a concession operated passenger ferry. The only other way you can get there is on your own boat. I really wanted to try to see Cumberland Island closer than from offshore, so I tried to get a reservation on the ferry in 2004. I had no luck - it was completely booked. So this time I made the reservation in October asked for a beach wheelchair. I also made a hotel reservation by the waterfront, and asked the hotel to give us a packed lunch.

Cat on the bed

Cat on the bed


We went down for breakfast in the morning. One of the cats was on someone's bed as I went by.
Looking down the stairs to the lobby

Looking down the stairs to the lobby

Fireplace

Fireplace

The portrait of the three sisters over the fireplace

The portrait of the three sisters over the fireplace

They were out of most things including any kind of juice. She finally brought me cranberry juice, and I had a bagel or something.

Since our reservation for the ferry wasn't until 11:30, we drove around through the town looking at the old houses.
City of St Marys Town Hall

City of St Marys Town Hall


City of St. Mary's

City of St. Mary's


We already had seen the hotel, the old grocery story where we had dinner and the Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum

Presented in the order they were built

  • Jackson Clark Bessent MacDonnell House, built circa 1801

100_8511.JPGJackson-Clark-Bessent-MacDonell-Nesbitt House c.1801 314 Osborne Street

Jackson-Clark-Bessent-MacDonell-Nesbitt House c.1801 314 Osborne Street


The two story wooden frame hall-parlor house was constructed for Charles Jackson, a Revolutionary War Soldier, and contains a series of additions dating to circa 1880, 1970, and 1980. The house shows evidence of having been I-shaped originally with the main elevation's siding thinner than the other portions of the house. The hip roof has a saltbox shape which incorporates the rear porch.

  • First Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church 1808 - bell cast by Paul Revere in the bell tower

First Presbyterian Church 1808 - bell cast by Paul Revere in the bell tower

First Presbyterian sign

First Presbyterian sign


was built in 1808 and the first pastor Reverend Horace Southworth Pratt was installed in 1822. This small cemetery contains the graves of Jane F. Wood Pratt (the wife of Rev. Pratt), and her parents John and Laleah Wood.
Graves at First Presbyterian

Graves at First Presbyterian


The cemetery is in the side yard of the church under the Pratt Oak. The wooden frame church with continuous masonry foundation and stucco coating was originally constructed for worship of all Christian faiths. The front tower has a pyramidal roofed belfry with turned balustrade along the entry steps which lead to the rounded arch entry.
f100_8513.JPGFirst Presbyterian - smugglers put a horse in the bell tower to distract the townfolk while they left town

First Presbyterian - smugglers put a horse in the bell tower to distract the townfolk while they left town


This entry was originally along the east elevation and was moved to the south during renovations in 1898.

  • Orange Hall, built circa 1835

Haunted Orange Hall - Greek Revival (1830)

Haunted Orange Hall - Greek Revival (1830)


This Greek Revival wooden frame house at 303 Osborne Street is on a continuous brick foundation is notable for its large preserved city lot and high style. The brick foundation serves as a useable basement for the large house. The front portico has double heighted Roman Doric columns, acanthus leaf embellishments in the pediment, and a Greek door surround.
100_8525.JPGOrange Hall sign

Orange Hall sign

  • Methodist church building

St Mary's United Methodist Church began meeting before 1812.  The chapel was built in 1858 at a cost of $695.  Interesting fact: originally including a balcony -it seated 200!

St Mary's United Methodist Church began meeting before 1812. The chapel was built in 1858 at a cost of $695. Interesting fact: originally including a balcony -it seated 200!


St Mary's Methodist Church

St Mary's Methodist Church

  • Long Bunkley Briggs House, built circa 1860.

Long-Bunkley-Briggs House c. 1860-104 Weed Street East,

Long-Bunkley-Briggs House c. 1860-104 Weed Street East,


The two story wooden frame I-shaped house has a single story porch with square posts. The house has mortise and tenon brace frame construction, an early addition (circa 1880s) to the rear and 1920s additions flanking the earlier extension.

  • Spencer House, built circa 1870.

Spencer House 1872 Vernacular Architecture Two Story Salmon Color Inn-200 Osborne Street/101 Bryant Street

Spencer House 1872 Vernacular Architecture Two Story Salmon Color Inn-200 Osborne Street/101 Bryant Street


Spencer House was built for the Collector of Customs, W.T. Spencer and his wife Louise by Theodore Spencer. The wooden frame house has Italianate and Neoclassical Revival elements including the round ached windows and Tuscan porch columns. The front double doors are also Italianate glazed doors with a two light transom window.

  • Christ Episcopal Church, circa 1885.

Christ Church 305 Wheeler Street

Christ Church 305 Wheeler Street

369e3930-d825-11ea-9a6c-2d41574c8609.JPGSide of the church

Side of the church


The small wooden frame church was built on brick piers features a pyramidal roof lantern and slight decorative crown moldings over the windows.

  • Miller Lovell House, built circa 1895.

Miller-Lovell House 303 Wheeler Street

Miller-Lovell House 303 Wheeler Street


The Neoclassical Revival Georgian inspired wooden frame cottage has a hip roof, corbeled chimney, and Tuscan columns which make it a good example of southern Neoclassical Revival cottages.

  • Miller Arnow House, built circa 1900.

Miller Arnow House - 105 Bryant Street West- now Golden Pineapple Antiques

Miller Arnow House - 105 Bryant Street West- now Golden Pineapple Antiques


The two story Folk Victorian style Miller Arnow House wooden frame building was originally built for James M. Miller. The house is notable for its two story integrated porch and full heighted double hung 2/2 sash windows on the main elevation.

  • Bachlott Porter House, built 1911

Bachlott- Porter House - built 1911 at 220 Osborne Street

Bachlott- Porter House - built 1911 at 220 Osborne Street


The wooden frame, hip roofed, Neoclassical Revival Queen Anne Bachlott Porter House stands on a continuous concrete foundation with ashlar stone finish. The eves have modilions, gables are pedimented, and there is a wide frieze band. Corner Pilasters have Ionic capitals, so does the wrap porch. The windows are largely leaded and lozenge shaped some of which have crown molding.

  • First Baptist Church- 1938

100_8529.JPGFirst Baptist Church

First Baptist Church

  • Harris House - built 1955

Harris House

Harris House

Unidentified houses in the historic district
3e9df3f0-d825-11ea-9a6c-2d41574c8609.JPGOne of the houses in the historic district

One of the houses in the historic district


All of the big old live oaks are named.
Live Oaks-This one looks like it has been in an altercation with a car

Live Oaks-This one looks like it has been in an altercation with a car

Then we went to the Oak Grove Cemetery
Monument in the cemetery

Monument in the cemetery


and wandered around - talked to some other people there.
Grave of an unknown child

Grave of an unknown child

Oak Grove Cemetery-Robert Ward Harrison Jr

Oak Grove Cemetery-Robert Ward Harrison Jr


The Boy Scouts did an Eagle Scout survey of the cemetery and posted a map of all the graves.

After we finished driving around St. Mary's, we went over to the National Park office and signed in for the 11:30 ferry.

Diversion

In the old days I would have definitely come to Cumberland and camped. Both developed and wilderness camping is available. Reservations can be made up to six months in advance. Permits are required and are picked up at the Sea Camp Ranger Station. All camping is limited to seven days. Spring and late fall are peak seasons. There is an anchorage
Anchorage area off Cumberland

Anchorage area off Cumberland


off the Sea Camp Dock and you can dingy ashore. But we've never had enough time to even do that.
Map of Cumberland Island

Map of Cumberland Island


Developed sites:

  • Sea Camp Campground is $4.00 per person per night. The campground at Sea Camp has restroom facilities with cold water showers, a small amphitheater for ranger programs, and boardwalk access to the beach. This campground consists of 16 individual camp sites and two group sites. Group sites can accommodate 10-20 people. Each campsite has a grill, fire ring, food cage, and picnic table. Sites are assigned upon arrival at the Sea Camp Ranger Station.
  • Stafford Campground sites are $2.00 per person per night and are located 3.5 miles from the Sea Camp Ranger Station. Restrooms, showers, and fire rings are available at the site. Fire rings are on a first come first serve basis. Sites are assigned at the Sea Camp Ranger Station.

NO FIRES, TREAT WATER, PACK OUT TRASH.

Backcountry and Wilderness Camping sites are $2.00 per person per night. There are no facilities at the Wilderness sites and water must be treated. Campfires are not permitted in the Wilderness and portable stoves are suggested for food preparation. The three Wilderness sites range from 5.5 to 10.5 miles from the Sea Camp ferry dock. Sites are assigned upon arrival at Sea Camp Ranger Station.

Observe and practice LEAVE NO TRACE principles.

  • Hickory Hill: 5.5 miles from Sea Camp, in the heart of the island, offers a fascinating close encounter with an intriguing interior freshwater wetland and its wildlife. Due to being located in a wetland area, bugs are often prevalent.
  • Yankee Paradise: 7.5 miles from Sea Camp, also in the center of the island and a half days walk to and from the Plum Orchard Mansion.
  • Brickhill Bluff: 10.5 miles from Sea Camp, located on the Brickhill River. A favorite place for seeing dolphins and manatees.

I can no longer do the camping, so if I wanted to stay on Cumberland I'd have to stay at the Greyfield Inn. It is very private and exclusive, and somewhat expensive with rooms running up to $600 a night. But I think that includes meals as there is nowhere else on the island to buy food. They have their own ferry service from Fernandina Beach.
Picture of Greyfield Inn from 1901

Picture of Greyfield Inn from 1901


In 1900, Thomas and Lucy Carnegie built Greyfield for their daughter, Margaret Ricketson. It was converted to an inn during 1962 by her daughter, Lucy R. Ferguson, and it retains the original furnishings from the turn of the century.

You get a full breakfast which includes fresh-squeezed orange juice and fruit, as well as eggs, pancakes or one of the Chef's specialties. Mid-day, you get picnic lunch. There is a cocktail hour each evening with hors d'oeuvres and dinner is a casually elegant affair, served in the glow of candlelight

End Diversion

After we checked in, we went downstairs to wait for the ranger to give us instructions. There was a group of about 10 couples from Elderhostel (aka Road Scholars) there and I listened to what their guide said. She said to stand on the boat side of the ranger because there wouldn't be enough seats for everyone. So I did the same
Elderhostel group eating lunch on the ferry

Elderhostel group eating lunch on the ferry


We got onto the ferry and did get seats. We ate our lunch on the ferry which included a club sandwich, chips, cheese crackers (Bob doesn't eat cheese, so I ate it), cookies, an apple (which Bob also didn't eat), and water.
NPS Ferry wake

NPS Ferry wake


There is no food service available on the island. There is no place on the island to purchase any consumables, including ice, food, beverages or anything else of that kind. Unless you can eat grass like the horses, either you Bring Your Own Lunch (BYOL) or you go without.
Water to drink

Water to drink


Water bottles can be refilled at the fountains at bathroom areas.
Bob dressed warmly, hat and sunglasses

Bob dressed warmly, hat and sunglasses


Ranger at the dock starting the tour

Ranger at the dock starting the tour

Ice House/Museum from the ferry dock

Ice House/Museum from the ferry dock

Rules and Information

Please Read

Please Read


The following are prohibited:
• the taking of wildlife or possessing unlawfully taken wildlife
• the feeding, touching, teasing, frightening or intentional disturbing of wildlife nesting, breeding or other activities
544075845037063-People_appro..and_Island.jpgHarassing the wildlife

Harassing the wildlife


• carrying or using a trap or net

Shells and shark’s teeth may be collected. All other resources can be observed and then returned to its proper place

• pets in the campgrounds or on the Ferry are prohibited

The following are prohibited at campgrounds
• failing to obtain a permit.
• digging or leveling the ground at a campsite
• creating or sustaining unreasonable noise between the hours of 10:00 pm and 6:00 am
• in non-developed areas, operating any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine
• depositing refuse in the plumbing fixtures or vaults of a toilet facility
This is not a trash receptacle

This is not a trash receptacle


• bathing, or washing food, clothing, dishes, or other property at public water outlets, except at those designated for such purpose

All trash must be packed out; no refuse facilities are available on the island.

(1) Fires are permitted in Sea Camp and Stafford camp sites in designated fire rings. Fires will be extinguished upon termination of use.
(2) Only dead and down wood may be collected for campfires.

There are no lifeguards present on Cumberland Island beaches. Only cross the dunes at the marked crossing places/

Respect the Private Property Signs
Be back in time to get your ferry

Be back in time to get your ferry


Be sure to be at the ferry dock to get your ferry back to St. Mary's.
239726845042459-Cumberland_Q..and_Island.jpgYou don't want to see the last boat leaving you

You don't want to see the last boat leaving you

------------

There are no motorized vehicles on the island for visitors except in extremely limited circumstances. There is a "Lands and Legacies" Tour which is a five to six hour motorized tour of the North End of the island, and there is transportation to the one hotel on the island. Otherwise you should expect to walk or hike everywhere. When the Carnegie family lived here, they had little electric vehicles which were recharged for them every night.

But I was not sure that I could do the amount of walking involved to see the sights. Regular wheelchairs don't do well on non-paved surfaces - most of the 'roads' are just packed sand. I found on the internet that they had beach wheelchairs. So I made a reservation for one.
Beach wheelchair - Bob's picture

Beach wheelchair - Bob's picture


When we got to the island, I found that the reservation had gotten lost, but the ranger went to the administration building,
Ranger coming around the ice house

Ranger coming around the ice house


and brought me the beach wheelchair. It wasn't like a regular beach wheelchair because it had huge tires like those monster trucks. It was hard to get into as it was tall and tippy. I had to have help - someone had to hold the chair down so it didn't fall over when I got in or out of it. Had I been really disabled, I could not have managed it. I think they had the tires reversed.

It was also QUITE hard to push. You need to have someone really strong to do that.

The ranger guided tour of the Dungeness Historic District is conducted daily and begins at Dungeness Dock at approximately 10:00am and 12:45pm. Each tour lasts about an hour. Cumberland Island contains four major historic districts and 87 structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This was just a tour of one of the historic districts.

Avenue of Live Oaks hung with Spanish moss

Avenue of Live Oaks hung with Spanish moss


We followed the ranger on her 1:00 tour. The Elderhostel people had their own guide. Bob pushed me down alleys of live oak hung with Spanish moss
881766545843423-People_walki..and_Island.jpg
The ranger told us that there have been three homes named Dungeness on Cumberland Island.

  • James Oglethorpe built a hunting lodge here and he named it Dungeness.
  • Cumberland Island was given to General Nathaniel Greene to repay the debts that he incurred in the Revolution. He and his wife built the second Dungeness - a four story tabby mansion on the site. His widow Catharine married Phineas Miller. This house was abandoned during the U.S. Civil War and burned in 1862.
  • The third Dungeness

Approaching Dungeness ruins

Approaching Dungeness ruins


25142915037060-Ruins_of_the..and_Island.jpgWalking around Dungeness

Walking around Dungeness

Dungeness from the side

Dungeness from the side


In 1880 the property was sold to General William George Mackay Davis, and in 1881 Davis Sold it to to Carnegie.
was built by Thomas M. Carnegie, brother of Andrew Carnegie. Lucy Carnegie died in 1916. 1920 was the last event in Dungeness. The Carnegies moved out of Dungeness in 1925.
818740395843788-Woman_with_d..and_Island.jpgWhat happens when you don't wear the right shoes

What happens when you don't wear the right shoes


The ruins you see are NOT the result of a war or even neglect. In 1959, it was destroyed by fire, alleged to be arson.
From Dungeness to the entrance gates

From Dungeness to the entrance gates

Mistletoe in the top of the trees

Mistletoe in the top of the trees


In addition to the main Dungeness building, there were other ruins
5842914-Another_ruin_Cumberland_Island.jpgRecreation building ruins

Recreation building ruins

free standing chimney

free standing chimney

tree stump and strange concrete blocks

tree stump and strange concrete blocks

Ruined building

Ruined building


We saw some of the wild horses, and also an armadillo.
Armadillo

Armadillo


Other than one armadillo that we saw, some birds, and the wild horses (and other tourists), most of the living things that we saw on our visit were plants.
Trees, vines and maybe a bird

Trees, vines and maybe a bird


The island has three major ecosystem regions. Along the western edge of the island there are large areas of salt marshes. The wild horses tend to overgraze those areas. Live oak trees covered with Spanish moss and the palmetto plants are at the edge of Cumberland's dense maritime forest.
Live oaks with Spanish Moss

Live oaks with Spanish Moss

162509655845105-Fungus_on_tr..and_Island.jpgFungus on tree trunk

Fungus on tree trunk

The island is home to many native animals. There are white-tailed deer, squirrels, raccoons, nine-banded armadillos, wild boars, and alligators. It is also famous for its wild horses roaming free on the island.
5845153-grazing_horse_Cumberland_Island.jpgGrazing horse

Grazing horse


Wild horses seem to live on remote barrier islands like Assateague and Cumberland. The ranger told us that they asked people what they should do with the feral animals on the island which included pigs, cows and horses. People had no problem with them getting rid of the wild boars and the cattle, but wanted the horses left alone.
Feral horses

Feral horses


So - they are left alone. Nothing is done for the horses - unlike Assateague or Chincoteague where they are rounded up and the herd culled and given shots and medical care, nothing is done for these horses. They aren't fed or vaccinated - they don't have their hooves trimmed and they aren't wormed.
5843774-Wild_Horses_Cumberland_Island.jpgon the Dungeness lawn

on the Dungeness lawn


They are wild and they are on their own. The ones up by the old ruins are in the best shape because they have access to fresh water

The one ecosystem that we didn't see on this visit was the beach, which stretches over 17 miles
Horses on the beach from our boat in the ICW in 2001

Horses on the beach from our boat in the ICW in 2001


We went past what looked like an auto graveyard with several Plymouths in it disintegrating into piles of rust.
Auto "graveyard"

Auto "graveyard"

226312585842913-Automobile_g..and_Island.jpgPiles of rust

Piles of rust


Then we got to a real graveyard - the Greene-Miller cemetery.
Iron entrance gate in the wall

Iron entrance gate in the wall


The wheelchair wouldn't go into it so I got out of the wheelchair and took some pictures
719850075843417-Empty_wheelc..and_Island.jpgBob with the wheelchair

Bob with the wheelchair


There are several cemeteries on Cumberland island and some contain gravestones for people who were initially buried there and then moved. Two of my interests are lighthouses and cemeteries. There is a lighthouse on Little Cumberland Island but you an only see it from the south end of Jekyll Island. In the 1970s we lived in a community called Greene in RI which was named after the General Nathanael Greene, so I was interested to learn about his connection to Cumberland Island.

Greene-Miller cemetery

Greene-Miller cemetery


The Greene-Miller Cemetery, named for the family of General Greene and Phineas Miller is east of the house and includes the graves of Catherine Green Miller, her daughter Louisa Shaw, and her husband James. Also in the cemetery are the graves of two of General William Davis' family. One was his grandson George who was accidentally shot by Bernard, his father, at about age five. And the other was General Davis' son Bernard who died shortly after the accident.
Memorial stone for Charles Jackson Esq

Memorial stone for Charles Jackson Esq


Also in the cemetery are two gravestones for Henry "Lighthorse Harry" Lee the father of Robert E. Lee which explain that he was buried there
Harry Lee's original burial place

Harry Lee's original burial place

Explanation of why he is no longer here

Explanation of why he is no longer here


and then moved. In the strife that led up to the War of 1812, Lee was injured while trying to protect a friend from rioters in Baltimore, Maryland, receiving wounds from which he never recovered. He died at Dungeness, on Cumberland Island, and was buried there. Lee was re-interred at the Lee Chapel Museum in Lexington in 1913.
Wall around cemetery

Wall around cemetery


Outside the main cemetery are the graves of John and Catherine Rikart.
Catherine Rinehart died 1911

Catherine Rinehart died 1911


The inscription on Catherine's grave says "Erected by the family of Thomas M. Carnegie in affectionate memory of faithful and loyal service During many years."

On the way back, several people helped Bob push the wheelchair. After we got back to the dock area,
Dock on Cumberland

Dock on Cumberland


Bob turned in the wheelchair (which was QUITE hard to push) and we looked in the little museum in the old Ice House.
Cooling Room door

Cooling Room door


Ice house explanation

Ice house explanation


There was a small cooling room with posters about water and ice.
Cooling Room posters

Cooling Room posters


The main part of the museum started with section called

  • Hunting and Gathering (Time of the Timucuans) which was about the Indians prior to Europeans colonizing the area.

Hunting and Gathering (Time of the Timucuans)

Hunting and Gathering (Time of the Timucuans)


The next section talks about

  • Agricultural (Plantation Era)

Agricultural Era

Agricultural Era


when the Revolutionary War hero General Nathaniel Greene and his wife Catherine (Caty) Greene settled here and built the second Dungeness. They were joined at Cumberland Island by Eli Whitney. Eli and Nathaniel tried unsuccessfully to market the cotton gin. The third main section was

  • The Gilded Age in the latter part of the 19th. century

The Gilded Age

The Gilded Age


when Thomas and Lucy Carnegie bought extensively on the island. The Carnegie's built the present Dungeness on the ruins of the Greene-Miller Dungeness.
Pictures of the houses in the icehouse/museum

Pictures of the houses in the icehouse/museum


There is another room of the museum which contains a series of displays about the War of 1812. I didn't get any photos there.

Then we sat around and waited for the afternoon boat

74973145845075-Not_the_Grey..and_Island.jpgPark Service administration building

Park Service administration building


If you didn't eat your lunch on the boat, there are plenty of picnic tables.
182340345844287-Edge_of_picn..and_Island.jpgPicnic tables under the live oak trees

Picnic tables under the live oak trees

Behind Bob

Behind Bob


and I lay on one of the picnic table benches and looked up at the Spanish moss
336320855844285-Lying_on_a_p..and_Island.jpgLying on a picnic table bench and looking up

Lying on a picnic table bench and looking up


and took a little nap
Salt marshes ecosystem on the western edge of the island

Salt marshes ecosystem on the western edge of the island


And talked to people. There was a lady there who used to teach 5th grade and then had a brain aneurysm and had a problem with vision and also walking and speech. She was there with her husband and nephew who was in 8th grade. He was a cheerful boy, but a typical 8th grader. He went down on the 'beach' near the landing dock and got all muddy.
Muddy Beach on the western side

Muddy Beach on the western side

Intercoastal Waterway side of Cumberland

Intercoastal Waterway side of Cumberland

Across at the mainland

Across at the mainland


There was a tall masted ship from CT with a crew of school girls and they also were using the boat landing.
Ship anchored off Cumberland Island

Ship anchored off Cumberland Island

Girls from the tall ship waiting for their ride

Girls from the tall ship waiting for their ride


Dock with small NPS boats

Dock with small NPS boats


The ferry went to the Sea Base dock first
Ferry at Sea Base dock

Ferry at Sea Base dock

Sitting in the shelter on the dock

Sitting in the shelter on the dock

My shadow on the sand at the dock

My shadow on the sand at the dock

Ferry coming for us

Ferry coming for us


We sat inside on the trip back to St. Mary's.
Back to St. Mary's

Back to St. Mary's


After we got back, we went to Captain Seagle's Restaurant - the hotel restaurant for dinner
100_8677.JPGInside of the restaurant

Inside of the restaurant


and as I said they were totally backlogged. They didn't have enough waitresses and the restaurant manager was having to do some of the cooking as some of the cooks didn't come in. So we had a long wait to get something to eat.Bob had
Bob's shrimp cocktail $7.00

Bob's shrimp cocktail $7.00


which he said was good, and a chicken tender basket.

I asked for
Brandon's Rock Shrimp Dip $7.00

Brandon's Rock Shrimp Dip $7.00


which was a mistake. They were out of it and that was what took all the time. And when I got it there was very little shrimp (I wanted to see what a Rock Shrimp looked like) and it tasted mostly of mayonnaise. I also had
A salad

A salad


and Key Lime pie ice cream.The Key Lime Pie ice cream was good.
Key Lime Pie Ice Cream

Key Lime Pie Ice Cream


Tomorrow we head for Fort Pierce

Posted by greatgrandmaR 12:13 Archived in USA Comments (0)

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