A Travellerspoint blog

This blog is published chronologically. Go straight to the most recent post.

Heading for the St. Mary's GA Sub Museum, Cumberland Island

On the way to the second Key West Visit


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2011 Back to Back Enchantment of the Seas and Lighthousing Driving South & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Friday 18 February 2011

The hotel had a nice breakfast in the morning which included waffles that you make yourself, pastries, hot and cold cereal, hard boiled eggs and juices including cranberry. (I had a waffle and a hard boiled egg and some Cheerios.) We checked out about 0835.
Highway leaving "Little Washington"

Highway leaving "Little Washington"


I had thought that we would take US 17 down to Summerville because that is shorter by about 30 miles. Bob assumed that of course we would go back over to I95. Had I known that, I would have made a reservation in a different place. Also if I had known that was what he wanted to do, I would have driven through the old part of town first.

We stopped for lunch at Friendlies at 11:35.
Friendly's inside

Friendly's inside


Bob had a cup of chili and a Fribble (their milkshake), and I had a
Friendly's BLT and a cup of applesauce

Friendly's BLT and a cup of applesauce


Happy Ending sundae which is the smallest sundae they have

Happy Ending sundae which is the smallest sundae they have



We stopped for gas (and for Bob to use the bathroom) at Santee about 1420
Hess gas

Hess gas


and the car was getting 35.3 mph on I-95. I remembered correctly that there was no place to get gas after we turned south toward Summerville.

I called my son after we left Santee and found that he was not expecting us because he thought we were going north to Maine. I had planned to go to Connecticut to see a granddaughter and then to Vermont to see a grandson in October (not in February), but that trip was scrapped. So we checked into the motel around 1510
Motel shower

Motel shower


and after we settled in, we drove over to our son's house. Our granddaughter was there with her mother and a friend of her brothers and we talked for awhile.
Samson

Samson


The store in Tortola sent the package that was to go to my son with his birthday present in it to me, and the package with gifts for everyone else to him. They wondered why I was sending them 5 bottles of ginger and 4 Christmas tree ornaments. I gave them the gifts we bought on the ship and gathered together the things that were sent to him by mistake.

Our grandson got home from track practice and we got to see his ferret Peaches. I have only one very blurry photo - she moves too fast to get a photo of her easily.
Grandson's ferret

Grandson's ferret


We met our son at Logan's Roadhouse for dinner.
Grandson, grandfather, son

Grandson, grandfather, son

Logan's Roadhouse is another franchise/chain restaurant operation. It was founded in 1991 and the home office is located in Nashville, TN.
fe52b5f0-d78f-11ea-917c-ffa6581796ef.jpgJukebox

Jukebox


in 2011, there were 124 restaurants in Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Michigan - Detroit Area, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia
Logan's Roadhouse

Logan's Roadhouse


It is supposed to be like a roadhouse from the 1930's and 1940's. I don't think of roadhouse with a positive image, but apparently Logan's has been very successful with this idea. They have TV sets in various corners, and a jukebox. There is a meat counter display case showing the various cuts of meat.
Meat showcase

Meat showcase


Looking at the menu

Looking at the menu


My son had a french dip sandwich (Roast beef, sauteed onions and mushrooms topped with melted Swiss cheese on a French roll; au jus for dipping, my husband had a Logan's Club Sandwich (Ham, turkey, bacon, lettuce, tomato, cheddar cheese and mayonnaise served on toasted bread), I had a
My steak

My steak

Apple cobbler with ice cream

Apple cobbler with ice cream


My grandchildren had kids meals.
unti2atled.jpg23481350-d790-11ea-917c-ffa6581796ef.JPG
We went back to the motel afterwards.

Saturday 19 February 2011 - Grandchildren and Grand-Pets

Our son called and said he had an appointment in the morning. He had suggested that we go to the Eastern South Carolina expo which he thought had something to do with boats, but which was really mostly on land activities outdoors, like hunting. They had Dock Dog competitions, and also hawk flying demonstrations. But the admission was $20 each and there were about 8 different locations which involved a lot more walking than I felt up to. So we decided against doing that.

My breakfast

My breakfast

We had breakfast at the hotel which was OK but they had no cranberry juice - just grapefruit juice. I tried to edit some photos, and then we had lunch at Chick-fil-A. We went in to eat.
Bob heading for lunch

Bob heading for lunch


There was a topiary cow and a lot of flowers outside.
Topiary cow

Topiary cow

100_8390.JPGFlowers outside Chik-fil-A

Flowers outside Chik-fil-A


Cows on the ceiling

Cows on the ceiling

c00c9350-d795-11ea-9256-9b53e6d0f640.JPGTable advert and Flowers on the tables

Table advert and Flowers on the tables


They had people taking the orders as the cars waited in line which made it much quicker.
Getting an order before you get to the speaker

Getting an order before you get to the speaker


Bob had

Chicken strips

Chicken strips

and I had
Sandwich

Sandwich

Shredded carrot salad

Shredded carrot salad

Total = $9.94

We went over to our son's after lunch. Our son cooked hamburgers and hotdogs on the grille and we had potato salad that our daughter-in-law had made.
Turtle in their aquarium

Turtle in their aquarium


Samson the cat

Samson the cat

100_8404.JPGCocoa and Merky the dogs

Cocoa and Merky the dogs

Granddaughter playing with the dogs

Granddaughter playing with the dogs


The weather was beautiful and we sat out on the porch. Our grandson took his motorcycle out for a spin.
Grandson on motorcycle

Grandson on motorcycle


We found out that our daughter-in-law starts work at a medical center in a week or so
Daughter-in-law

Daughter-in-law


and that my son was in a band called "Farmer Tan" and they have a regular gig on Monday nights. Our son sings, and his friend Mike plays the guitar and Mike's wife plays the bongos. Unfortunately we would not be able to stay and see the first night because I had made reservations back in October to go to St. Mary's GA on Sunday.
100_8412.JPGBonfire

Bonfire

Sunday 20 February 2011

I had a goal for today which was to visit the submarine museum in St. Mary's GA - we missed it last time we were here (in 2004) because Bob decided to leave early.
100_8420.JPGSummerville town square

Summerville town square


We got underway about 9. We went down US 17
Following Route 17

Following Route 17


through a place called Round O. We saw some wild turkeys by the road. The last place before we hit I-95 was Walterboro. I noticed several horse dealers in the area and also saw a sign advertising "concealed carry classes".
Georgia Welcome station

Georgia Welcome station


We stopped for lunch about noon just before we got to St. Mary's.
KFC

KFC


We ate at KFC and it was a very lively place with a lot of local people eating Sunday dinner there. Bob had
Three chicken strips

Three chicken strips


and I had
BBQ sandwich

BBQ sandwich

When we got to St. Mary's we parked and went to the museum. Bob was in the U.S. Navy submariner reserve in high school and the following year before he went to the U.S. Naval Academy. So on our re-visit, the first thing we visited was this museum.
44140311414298-From_across_..aint_Marys.jpgSubmarine museum - left 2004 - right 2011

Submarine museum - left 2004 - right 2011


St. Marys Submarine Museum is in a converted historic movie theater (built in 1911) on the St. Marys waterfront. They have a working periscope, models of torpedoes, many displays made from actual submarines
Hatch

Hatch

Control panel

Control panel

Bunk

Bunk


a deep-sea diving suit
Diving suit

Diving suit


and submarine uniforms, command plaques,
Wall of command plaques - The one on the left 2nd from the end is one we have because Bob served on that ship

Wall of command plaques - The one on the left 2nd from the end is one we have because Bob served on that ship


Close-up of U.S.S. Conger plaque - Sub that Bob served on

Close-up of U.S.S. Conger plaque - Sub that Bob served on


photographs and models of submarines, an area for watching movies on submarines, working sonar panels,
Display

Display


a history of submarines, a reading area, a reference area, gift shop and a display dedicated to the eight submariners who received the Medals of Honor. Bob is of the opinion that it needs a good organizing - it appears to be a collection of collections. It was fun though.
.
Then we checked into the Riverview Hotel We saw this hotel in 2004 when we were walking along the waterfront from the marina.
Bob reflected in the front window of the Riverview

Bob reflected in the front window of the Riverview


When we came back to go to Cumberland Island, we booked in this hotel because it was the closest to the Cumberland Island ferries and I could walk across the street to them. The Riverview Hotel was built 1916. This tabby coated 105 Osborne Street hotel boasts a two story porch along its Osborne Street elevation.
Riverview Hotel

Riverview Hotel


The hotel is clean and old. Not fancy old with bed flounces and lots of little pillows. It is just old. It has Mission Oak furniture and some of the stair carpet is worn. They have wi-fi which I can almost get in the room, but they also have a big staircase to climb every time we go up to our room. Definitely not handicapped accessible.
Upper hallway

Upper hallway


This historic hotel was built in 1916. The rooms have all been named after people who have either stayed at the Riverview Hotel or are locally famous. The rooms are named after people as varied as Admiral Nimitz and the weatherman Willard Scott. We stayed in the Talmadge room - named after Georgia Governor Eugene Talmadge. We had two iron bedsteads - brass bedstead types with quilts, but the metal is painted black.
Wardrobe/shrank with bed reflected and TV on top

Wardrobe/shrank with bed reflected and TV on top


There is a shrank for a closet and our own bathroom.
Through the bathroom door

Through the bathroom door


There are plantation shutters on the windows.
View from the hotel

View from the hotel


The Riverview Hotel is an official SSCA Cruising station and will receive mail & packages for cruisers. This would be important to us - except for the rules that Georgia has against living aboard a boat which means that we can't stay here on our boat for more than a month.

Amenities include air conditioning, daily maid service, cable TV, HBO + ESPN, and continental breakfast. Hairdryers, alarm clocks, and iron available upon request.

Canon on the town square

Canon on the town square


We saw a President's Day parade at the waterfront.
President's day flag bearers

President's day flag bearers


5036784-Presidents_Day_Parade_Saint_Marys.jpgPresident's Day parade

President's Day parade

Photographer

Photographer


Then we went over to the NPS headquarters and checked on our reservation.
Cumberland Lady ferry

Cumberland Lady ferry

Informational sign

Informational sign

and looked at the exhibits.
Turtle nest diorama

Turtle nest diorama


Oyster Catcher

Oyster Catcher


We were too late to get the trolley tour.
100_8473.JPGTrolley tours start here--last trolley tour leaving the waterfront

Trolley tours start here--last trolley tour leaving the waterfront


National Seashore offices in historic building

National Seashore offices in historic building


The new museum is on St. Mary's Street, right on the water. The NPS website says:"The exhibition uses pieces from the collection to highlight the people of the island. The lives of Native Americans, African Americans, the Carnegie family as well as others who lived on the island in the 19th and 20th centuries are seen in the island environment. The museum was designed to provide a glimpse of Cumberland Island to those who are unable to visit the island. These exhibits were funded through fees paid by island visitors and campers. A small portion of the total collection will be on display, primarily pieces that illustrate life on the barrier island.
Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum

Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum


“These are objects that have never before been on public display,” said curator John Mitchell. “We can learn from these items about how people lived in the past.”"

US Coast and Geodetic Survey Bench  Mark

US Coast and Geodetic Survey Bench Mark


Available Facilities Public restrooms and water fountain

Some confusion in museum names has developed between the Cumberland Island Museum and the Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum.The Cumberland Island Museum is a separate entity and was incorporated in 1985 to assure the protection and maintenance of the library, archival materials, and natural history collections of Carol Ruckdeschel and C. Robert Shoop. Unlike some museums, The Cumberland Island Museum does not have exhibits or displays, but simply houses and curates the research materials. It is on Cumberland Island. It is open to the public.
Riverside park

Riverside park

5841745-Another_street_scene_Saint_Marys.jpgCentral street with Market on the Square on right

Central street with Market on the Square on right

5841742-Market_on_the_Square_Saint_Marys.jpgMarket on the Square- They were having a sale

Market on the Square- They were having a sale


I thought we would eat at Langs (where we tried to eat before but they had too much of a wait)
Lang's is on the other side of the STOP sign

Lang's is on the other side of the STOP sign

Bob walking back across to tell me it was closed

Bob walking back across to tell me it was closed


but they are not open until Weds.

So we drove out to the Silver Star Steakhouse - built in 1890
5841729-Sign_in_the_window_Saint_Marys.jpgFront of the restaurant

Front of the restaurant

Boot as a planter by the door

Boot as a planter by the door


which used to be a grocery store.
Explanation on the menu

Explanation on the menu

Inside of the restaurant

Inside of the restaurant


I ordered an oyster po-boy, but there were out of oysters, so I had a fish sandwich instead.
Fish sandwich

Fish sandwich


Bob had a cup of crab bisque and fish and chips.
Bob's Fish and chips $9.99

Bob's Fish and chips $9.99


I brought home a key lime cheesecake but I couldn't find the plastic fork that I thought I had in my bag.
Night in St. Mary's

Night in St. Mary's


Later: The Key Lime Cheesecake was very good. I can't remember what I used to eat it with though.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:23 Archived in USA Tagged cat museum dogs turtle south_carolina submarines ice_cream ferret summerville Comments (2)

The Dungeness of Oglethorpe, Greene, and Carnegie

Historic St. Mary's Georgia


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2011 Back to Back Enchantment of the Seas and Lighthousing Driving South & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Monday 21 February 2011

Chart of Cumberland Island

Chart of Cumberland Island

Seven miles east of St. Mary's Georgia and just north of Amelia Island Florida, Cumberland Island is the largest and southernmost barrier island in the Georgia sea island chain. It is skirted on the east by an unbroken fringe of Atlantic coastal beach. Most of the island is included in the Cumberland Island National Seashore, but some of the people who had property on the island when it was made into a National Park retain the rights to live on the island for their lifetimes. We have been all around it by sea, but until 2011 we had never actually been to the island. We've come from Jekyll Island and gone out Brunswick Inlet into St. Andrews Sound (top of the chart) and come around it and come in the St. Mary's Inlet. (bottom of the chart). And then when we were coming north 3 or 4 months later, we've come from Fernandina up Cumberland Sound past Kings Bay Submarine Base and up the Cumberland River to Jekyll Island in the Intercoastal Waterway

It is accessible by a concession operated passenger ferry. The only other way you can get there is on your own boat. I really wanted to try to see Cumberland Island closer than from offshore, so I tried to get a reservation on the ferry in 2004. I had no luck - it was completely booked. So this time I made the reservation in October asked for a beach wheelchair. I also made a hotel reservation by the waterfront, and asked the hotel to give us a packed lunch.

Cat on the bed

Cat on the bed


We went down for breakfast in the morning. One of the cats was on someone's bed as I went by.
Looking down the stairs to the lobby

Looking down the stairs to the lobby

Fireplace

Fireplace

The portrait of the three sisters over the fireplace

The portrait of the three sisters over the fireplace

They were out of most things including any kind of juice. She finally brought me cranberry juice, and I had a bagel or something.

Since our reservation for the ferry wasn't until 11:30, we drove around through the town looking at the old houses.
City of St Marys Town Hall

City of St Marys Town Hall


City of St. Mary's

City of St. Mary's


We already had seen the hotel, the old grocery story where we had dinner and the Cumberland Island National Seashore Museum

Presented in the order they were built

  • Jackson Clark Bessent MacDonnell House, built circa 1801

100_8511.JPGJackson-Clark-Bessent-MacDonell-Nesbitt House c.1801 314 Osborne Street

Jackson-Clark-Bessent-MacDonell-Nesbitt House c.1801 314 Osborne Street


The two story wooden frame hall-parlor house was constructed for Charles Jackson, a Revolutionary War Soldier, and contains a series of additions dating to circa 1880, 1970, and 1980. The house shows evidence of having been I-shaped originally with the main elevation's siding thinner than the other portions of the house. The hip roof has a saltbox shape which incorporates the rear porch.

  • First Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church 1808 - bell cast by Paul Revere in the bell tower

First Presbyterian Church 1808 - bell cast by Paul Revere in the bell tower

First Presbyterian sign

First Presbyterian sign


was built in 1808 and the first pastor Reverend Horace Southworth Pratt was installed in 1822. This small cemetery contains the graves of Jane F. Wood Pratt (the wife of Rev. Pratt), and her parents John and Laleah Wood.
Graves at First Presbyterian

Graves at First Presbyterian


The cemetery is in the side yard of the church under the Pratt Oak. The wooden frame church with continuous masonry foundation and stucco coating was originally constructed for worship of all Christian faiths. The front tower has a pyramidal roofed belfry with turned balustrade along the entry steps which lead to the rounded arch entry.
f100_8513.JPGFirst Presbyterian - smugglers put a horse in the bell tower to distract the townfolk while they left town

First Presbyterian - smugglers put a horse in the bell tower to distract the townfolk while they left town


This entry was originally along the east elevation and was moved to the south during renovations in 1898.

  • Orange Hall, built circa 1835

Haunted Orange Hall - Greek Revival (1830)

Haunted Orange Hall - Greek Revival (1830)


This Greek Revival wooden frame house at 303 Osborne Street is on a continuous brick foundation is notable for its large preserved city lot and high style. The brick foundation serves as a useable basement for the large house. The front portico has double heighted Roman Doric columns, acanthus leaf embellishments in the pediment, and a Greek door surround.
100_8525.JPGOrange Hall sign

Orange Hall sign

  • Methodist church building

St Mary's United Methodist Church began meeting before 1812.  The chapel was built in 1858 at a cost of $695.  Interesting fact: originally including a balcony -it seated 200!

St Mary's United Methodist Church began meeting before 1812. The chapel was built in 1858 at a cost of $695. Interesting fact: originally including a balcony -it seated 200!


St Mary's Methodist Church

St Mary's Methodist Church

  • Long Bunkley Briggs House, built circa 1860.

Long-Bunkley-Briggs House c. 1860-104 Weed Street East,

Long-Bunkley-Briggs House c. 1860-104 Weed Street East,


The two story wooden frame I-shaped house has a single story porch with square posts. The house has mortise and tenon brace frame construction, an early addition (circa 1880s) to the rear and 1920s additions flanking the earlier extension.

  • Spencer House, built circa 1870.

Spencer House 1872 Vernacular Architecture Two Story Salmon Color Inn-200 Osborne Street/101 Bryant Street

Spencer House 1872 Vernacular Architecture Two Story Salmon Color Inn-200 Osborne Street/101 Bryant Street


Spencer House was built for the Collector of Customs, W.T. Spencer and his wife Louise by Theodore Spencer. The wooden frame house has Italianate and Neoclassical Revival elements including the round ached windows and Tuscan porch columns. The front double doors are also Italianate glazed doors with a two light transom window.

  • Christ Episcopal Church, circa 1885.

Christ Church 305 Wheeler Street

Christ Church 305 Wheeler Street

369e3930-d825-11ea-9a6c-2d41574c8609.JPGSide of the church

Side of the church


The small wooden frame church was built on brick piers features a pyramidal roof lantern and slight decorative crown moldings over the windows.

  • Miller Lovell House, built circa 1895.

Miller-Lovell House 303 Wheeler Street

Miller-Lovell House 303 Wheeler Street


The Neoclassical Revival Georgian inspired wooden frame cottage has a hip roof, corbeled chimney, and Tuscan columns which make it a good example of southern Neoclassical Revival cottages.

  • Miller Arnow House, built circa 1900.

Miller Arnow House - 105 Bryant Street West- now Golden Pineapple Antiques

Miller Arnow House - 105 Bryant Street West- now Golden Pineapple Antiques


The two story Folk Victorian style Miller Arnow House wooden frame building was originally built for James M. Miller. The house is notable for its two story integrated porch and full heighted double hung 2/2 sash windows on the main elevation.

  • Bachlott Porter House, built 1911

Bachlott- Porter House - built 1911 at 220 Osborne Street

Bachlott- Porter House - built 1911 at 220 Osborne Street


The wooden frame, hip roofed, Neoclassical Revival Queen Anne Bachlott Porter House stands on a continuous concrete foundation with ashlar stone finish. The eves have modilions, gables are pedimented, and there is a wide frieze band. Corner Pilasters have Ionic capitals, so does the wrap porch. The windows are largely leaded and lozenge shaped some of which have crown molding.

  • First Baptist Church- 1938

100_8529.JPGFirst Baptist Church

First Baptist Church

  • Harris House - built 1955

Harris House

Harris House

Unidentified houses in the historic district
3e9df3f0-d825-11ea-9a6c-2d41574c8609.JPGOne of the houses in the historic district

One of the houses in the historic district


All of the big old live oaks are named.
Live Oaks-This one looks like it has been in an altercation with a car

Live Oaks-This one looks like it has been in an altercation with a car

Then we went to the Oak Grove Cemetery
Monument in the cemetery

Monument in the cemetery


and wandered around - talked to some other people there.
Grave of an unknown child

Grave of an unknown child

Oak Grove Cemetery-Robert Ward Harrison Jr

Oak Grove Cemetery-Robert Ward Harrison Jr


The Boy Scouts did an Eagle Scout survey of the cemetery and posted a map of all the graves.

After we finished driving around St. Mary's, we went over to the National Park office and signed in for the 11:30 ferry.

Diversion

In the old days I would have definitely come to Cumberland and camped. Both developed and wilderness camping is available. Reservations can be made up to six months in advance. Permits are required and are picked up at the Sea Camp Ranger Station. All camping is limited to seven days. Spring and late fall are peak seasons. There is an anchorage
Anchorage area off Cumberland

Anchorage area off Cumberland


off the Sea Camp Dock and you can dingy ashore. But we've never had enough time to even do that.
Map of Cumberland Island

Map of Cumberland Island


Developed sites:

  • Sea Camp Campground is $4.00 per person per night. The campground at Sea Camp has restroom facilities with cold water showers, a small amphitheater for ranger programs, and boardwalk access to the beach. This campground consists of 16 individual camp sites and two group sites. Group sites can accommodate 10-20 people. Each campsite has a grill, fire ring, food cage, and picnic table. Sites are assigned upon arrival at the Sea Camp Ranger Station.
  • Stafford Campground sites are $2.00 per person per night and are located 3.5 miles from the Sea Camp Ranger Station. Restrooms, showers, and fire rings are available at the site. Fire rings are on a first come first serve basis. Sites are assigned at the Sea Camp Ranger Station.

NO FIRES, TREAT WATER, PACK OUT TRASH.

Backcountry and Wilderness Camping sites are $2.00 per person per night. There are no facilities at the Wilderness sites and water must be treated. Campfires are not permitted in the Wilderness and portable stoves are suggested for food preparation. The three Wilderness sites range from 5.5 to 10.5 miles from the Sea Camp ferry dock. Sites are assigned upon arrival at Sea Camp Ranger Station.

Observe and practice LEAVE NO TRACE principles.

  • Hickory Hill: 5.5 miles from Sea Camp, in the heart of the island, offers a fascinating close encounter with an intriguing interior freshwater wetland and its wildlife. Due to being located in a wetland area, bugs are often prevalent.
  • Yankee Paradise: 7.5 miles from Sea Camp, also in the center of the island and a half days walk to and from the Plum Orchard Mansion.
  • Brickhill Bluff: 10.5 miles from Sea Camp, located on the Brickhill River. A favorite place for seeing dolphins and manatees.

I can no longer do the camping, so if I wanted to stay on Cumberland I'd have to stay at the Greyfield Inn. It is very private and exclusive, and somewhat expensive with rooms running up to $600 a night. But I think that includes meals as there is nowhere else on the island to buy food. They have their own ferry service from Fernandina Beach.
Picture of Greyfield Inn from 1901

Picture of Greyfield Inn from 1901


In 1900, Thomas and Lucy Carnegie built Greyfield for their daughter, Margaret Ricketson. It was converted to an inn during 1962 by her daughter, Lucy R. Ferguson, and it retains the original furnishings from the turn of the century.

You get a full breakfast which includes fresh-squeezed orange juice and fruit, as well as eggs, pancakes or one of the Chef's specialties. Mid-day, you get picnic lunch. There is a cocktail hour each evening with hors d'oeuvres and dinner is a casually elegant affair, served in the glow of candlelight

End Diversion

After we checked in, we went downstairs to wait for the ranger to give us instructions. There was a group of about 10 couples from Elderhostel (aka Road Scholars) there and I listened to what their guide said. She said to stand on the boat side of the ranger because there wouldn't be enough seats for everyone. So I did the same
Elderhostel group eating lunch on the ferry

Elderhostel group eating lunch on the ferry


We got onto the ferry and did get seats. We ate our lunch on the ferry which included a club sandwich, chips, cheese crackers (Bob doesn't eat cheese, so I ate it), cookies, an apple (which Bob also didn't eat), and water.
NPS Ferry wake

NPS Ferry wake


There is no food service available on the island. There is no place on the island to purchase any consumables, including ice, food, beverages or anything else of that kind. Unless you can eat grass like the horses, either you Bring Your Own Lunch (BYOL) or you go without.
Water to drink

Water to drink


Water bottles can be refilled at the fountains at bathroom areas.
Bob dressed warmly, hat and sunglasses

Bob dressed warmly, hat and sunglasses


Ranger at the dock starting the tour

Ranger at the dock starting the tour

Ice House/Museum from the ferry dock

Ice House/Museum from the ferry dock

Rules and Information

Please Read

Please Read


The following are prohibited:
• the taking of wildlife or possessing unlawfully taken wildlife
• the feeding, touching, teasing, frightening or intentional disturbing of wildlife nesting, breeding or other activities
544075845037063-People_appro..and_Island.jpgHarassing the wildlife

Harassing the wildlife


• carrying or using a trap or net

Shells and shark’s teeth may be collected. All other resources can be observed and then returned to its proper place

• pets in the campgrounds or on the Ferry are prohibited

The following are prohibited at campgrounds
• failing to obtain a permit.
• digging or leveling the ground at a campsite
• creating or sustaining unreasonable noise between the hours of 10:00 pm and 6:00 am
• in non-developed areas, operating any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine
• depositing refuse in the plumbing fixtures or vaults of a toilet facility
This is not a trash receptacle

This is not a trash receptacle


• bathing, or washing food, clothing, dishes, or other property at public water outlets, except at those designated for such purpose

All trash must be packed out; no refuse facilities are available on the island.

(1) Fires are permitted in Sea Camp and Stafford camp sites in designated fire rings. Fires will be extinguished upon termination of use.
(2) Only dead and down wood may be collected for campfires.

There are no lifeguards present on Cumberland Island beaches. Only cross the dunes at the marked crossing places/

Respect the Private Property Signs
Be back in time to get your ferry

Be back in time to get your ferry


Be sure to be at the ferry dock to get your ferry back to St. Mary's.
239726845042459-Cumberland_Q..and_Island.jpgYou don't want to see the last boat leaving you

You don't want to see the last boat leaving you

------------

There are no motorized vehicles on the island for visitors except in extremely limited circumstances. There is a "Lands and Legacies" Tour which is a five to six hour motorized tour of the North End of the island, and there is transportation to the one hotel on the island. Otherwise you should expect to walk or hike everywhere. When the Carnegie family lived here, they had little electric vehicles which were recharged for them every night.

But I was not sure that I could do the amount of walking involved to see the sights. Regular wheelchairs don't do well on non-paved surfaces - most of the 'roads' are just packed sand. I found on the internet that they had beach wheelchairs. So I made a reservation for one.
Beach wheelchair - Bob's picture

Beach wheelchair - Bob's picture


When we got to the island, I found that the reservation had gotten lost, but the ranger went to the administration building,
Ranger coming around the ice house

Ranger coming around the ice house


and brought me the beach wheelchair. It wasn't like a regular beach wheelchair because it had huge tires like those monster trucks. It was hard to get into as it was tall and tippy. I had to have help - someone had to hold the chair down so it didn't fall over when I got in or out of it. Had I been really disabled, I could not have managed it. I think they had the tires reversed.

It was also QUITE hard to push. You need to have someone really strong to do that.

The ranger guided tour of the Dungeness Historic District is conducted daily and begins at Dungeness Dock at approximately 10:00am and 12:45pm. Each tour lasts about an hour. Cumberland Island contains four major historic districts and 87 structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This was just a tour of one of the historic districts.

Avenue of Live Oaks hung with Spanish moss

Avenue of Live Oaks hung with Spanish moss


We followed the ranger on her 1:00 tour. The Elderhostel people had their own guide. Bob pushed me down alleys of live oak hung with Spanish moss
881766545843423-People_walki..and_Island.jpg
The ranger told us that there have been three homes named Dungeness on Cumberland Island.

  • James Oglethorpe built a hunting lodge here and he named it Dungeness.
  • Cumberland Island was given to General Nathaniel Greene to repay the debts that he incurred in the Revolution. He and his wife built the second Dungeness - a four story tabby mansion on the site. His widow Catharine married Phineas Miller. This house was abandoned during the U.S. Civil War and burned in 1862.
  • The third Dungeness

Approaching Dungeness ruins

Approaching Dungeness ruins


25142915037060-Ruins_of_the..and_Island.jpgWalking around Dungeness

Walking around Dungeness

Dungeness from the side

Dungeness from the side


In 1880 the property was sold to General William George Mackay Davis, and in 1881 Davis Sold it to to Carnegie.
was built by Thomas M. Carnegie, brother of Andrew Carnegie. Lucy Carnegie died in 1916. 1920 was the last event in Dungeness. The Carnegies moved out of Dungeness in 1925.
818740395843788-Woman_with_d..and_Island.jpgWhat happens when you don't wear the right shoes

What happens when you don't wear the right shoes


The ruins you see are NOT the result of a war or even neglect. In 1959, it was destroyed by fire, alleged to be arson.
From Dungeness to the entrance gates

From Dungeness to the entrance gates

Mistletoe in the top of the trees

Mistletoe in the top of the trees


In addition to the main Dungeness building, there were other ruins
5842914-Another_ruin_Cumberland_Island.jpgRecreation building ruins

Recreation building ruins

free standing chimney

free standing chimney

tree stump and strange concrete blocks

tree stump and strange concrete blocks

Ruined building

Ruined building


We saw some of the wild horses, and also an armadillo.
Armadillo

Armadillo


Other than one armadillo that we saw, some birds, and the wild horses (and other tourists), most of the living things that we saw on our visit were plants.
Trees, vines and maybe a bird

Trees, vines and maybe a bird


The island has three major ecosystem regions. Along the western edge of the island there are large areas of salt marshes. The wild horses tend to overgraze those areas. Live oak trees covered with Spanish moss and the palmetto plants are at the edge of Cumberland's dense maritime forest.
Live oaks with Spanish Moss

Live oaks with Spanish Moss

162509655845105-Fungus_on_tr..and_Island.jpgFungus on tree trunk

Fungus on tree trunk

The island is home to many native animals. There are white-tailed deer, squirrels, raccoons, nine-banded armadillos, wild boars, and alligators. It is also famous for its wild horses roaming free on the island.
5845153-grazing_horse_Cumberland_Island.jpgGrazing horse

Grazing horse


Wild horses seem to live on remote barrier islands like Assateague and Cumberland. The ranger told us that they asked people what they should do with the feral animals on the island which included pigs, cows and horses. People had no problem with them getting rid of the wild boars and the cattle, but wanted the horses left alone.
Feral horses

Feral horses


So - they are left alone. Nothing is done for the horses - unlike Assateague or Chincoteague where they are rounded up and the herd culled and given shots and medical care, nothing is done for these horses. They aren't fed or vaccinated - they don't have their hooves trimmed and they aren't wormed.
5843774-Wild_Horses_Cumberland_Island.jpgon the Dungeness lawn

on the Dungeness lawn


They are wild and they are on their own. The ones up by the old ruins are in the best shape because they have access to fresh water

The one ecosystem that we didn't see on this visit was the beach, which stretches over 17 miles
Horses on the beach from our boat in the ICW in 2001

Horses on the beach from our boat in the ICW in 2001


We went past what looked like an auto graveyard with several Plymouths in it disintegrating into piles of rust.
Auto "graveyard"

Auto "graveyard"

226312585842913-Automobile_g..and_Island.jpgPiles of rust

Piles of rust


Then we got to a real graveyard - the Greene-Miller cemetery.
Iron entrance gate in the wall

Iron entrance gate in the wall


The wheelchair wouldn't go into it so I got out of the wheelchair and took some pictures
719850075843417-Empty_wheelc..and_Island.jpgBob with the wheelchair

Bob with the wheelchair


There are several cemeteries on Cumberland island and some contain gravestones for people who were initially buried there and then moved. Two of my interests are lighthouses and cemeteries. There is a lighthouse on Little Cumberland Island but you an only see it from the south end of Jekyll Island. In the 1970s we lived in a community called Greene in RI which was named after the General Nathanael Greene, so I was interested to learn about his connection to Cumberland Island.

Greene-Miller cemetery

Greene-Miller cemetery


The Greene-Miller Cemetery, named for the family of General Greene and Phineas Miller is east of the house and includes the graves of Catherine Green Miller, her daughter Louisa Shaw, and her husband James. Also in the cemetery are the graves of two of General William Davis' family. One was his grandson George who was accidentally shot by Bernard, his father, at about age five. And the other was General Davis' son Bernard who died shortly after the accident.
Memorial stone for Charles Jackson Esq

Memorial stone for Charles Jackson Esq


Also in the cemetery are two gravestones for Henry "Lighthorse Harry" Lee the father of Robert E. Lee which explain that he was buried there
Harry Lee's original burial place

Harry Lee's original burial place

Explanation of why he is no longer here

Explanation of why he is no longer here


and then moved. In the strife that led up to the War of 1812, Lee was injured while trying to protect a friend from rioters in Baltimore, Maryland, receiving wounds from which he never recovered. He died at Dungeness, on Cumberland Island, and was buried there. Lee was re-interred at the Lee Chapel Museum in Lexington in 1913.
Wall around cemetery

Wall around cemetery


Outside the main cemetery are the graves of John and Catherine Rikart.
Catherine Rinehart died 1911

Catherine Rinehart died 1911


The inscription on Catherine's grave says "Erected by the family of Thomas M. Carnegie in affectionate memory of faithful and loyal service During many years."

On the way back, several people helped Bob push the wheelchair. After we got back to the dock area,
Dock on Cumberland

Dock on Cumberland


Bob turned in the wheelchair (which was QUITE hard to push) and we looked in the little museum in the old Ice House.
Cooling Room door

Cooling Room door


Ice house explanation

Ice house explanation


There was a small cooling room with posters about water and ice.
Cooling Room posters

Cooling Room posters


The main part of the museum started with section called

  • Hunting and Gathering (Time of the Timucuans) which was about the Indians prior to Europeans colonizing the area.

Hunting and Gathering (Time of the Timucuans)

Hunting and Gathering (Time of the Timucuans)


The next section talks about

  • Agricultural (Plantation Era)

Agricultural Era

Agricultural Era


when the Revolutionary War hero General Nathaniel Greene and his wife Catherine (Caty) Greene settled here and built the second Dungeness. They were joined at Cumberland Island by Eli Whitney. Eli and Nathaniel tried unsuccessfully to market the cotton gin. The third main section was

  • The Gilded Age in the latter part of the 19th. century

The Gilded Age

The Gilded Age


when Thomas and Lucy Carnegie bought extensively on the island. The Carnegie's built the present Dungeness on the ruins of the Greene-Miller Dungeness.
Pictures of the houses in the icehouse/museum

Pictures of the houses in the icehouse/museum


There is another room of the museum which contains a series of displays about the War of 1812. I didn't get any photos there.

Then we sat around and waited for the afternoon boat

74973145845075-Not_the_Grey..and_Island.jpgPark Service administration building

Park Service administration building


If you didn't eat your lunch on the boat, there are plenty of picnic tables.
182340345844287-Edge_of_picn..and_Island.jpgPicnic tables under the live oak trees

Picnic tables under the live oak trees

Behind Bob

Behind Bob


and I lay on one of the picnic table benches and looked up at the Spanish moss
336320855844285-Lying_on_a_p..and_Island.jpgLying on a picnic table bench and looking up

Lying on a picnic table bench and looking up


and took a little nap
Salt marshes ecosystem on the western edge of the island

Salt marshes ecosystem on the western edge of the island


And talked to people. There was a lady there who used to teach 5th grade and then had a brain aneurysm and had a problem with vision and also walking and speech. She was there with her husband and nephew who was in 8th grade. He was a cheerful boy, but a typical 8th grader. He went down on the 'beach' near the landing dock and got all muddy.
Muddy Beach on the western side

Muddy Beach on the western side

Intercoastal Waterway side of Cumberland

Intercoastal Waterway side of Cumberland

Across at the mainland

Across at the mainland


There was a tall masted ship from CT with a crew of school girls and they also were using the boat landing.
Ship anchored off Cumberland Island

Ship anchored off Cumberland Island

Girls from the tall ship waiting for their ride

Girls from the tall ship waiting for their ride


Dock with small NPS boats

Dock with small NPS boats


The ferry went to the Sea Base dock first
Ferry at Sea Base dock

Ferry at Sea Base dock

Sitting in the shelter on the dock

Sitting in the shelter on the dock

My shadow on the sand at the dock

My shadow on the sand at the dock

Ferry coming for us

Ferry coming for us


We sat inside on the trip back to St. Mary's.
Back to St. Mary's

Back to St. Mary's


After we got back, we went to Captain Seagle's Restaurant - the hotel restaurant for dinner
100_8677.JPGInside of the restaurant

Inside of the restaurant


and as I said they were totally backlogged. They didn't have enough waitresses and the restaurant manager was having to do some of the cooking as some of the cooks didn't come in. So we had a long wait to get something to eat.Bob had
Bob's shrimp cocktail $7.00

Bob's shrimp cocktail $7.00


which he said was good, and a chicken tender basket.

I asked for
Brandon's Rock Shrimp Dip $7.00

Brandon's Rock Shrimp Dip $7.00


which was a mistake. They were out of it and that was what took all the time. And when I got it there was very little shrimp (I wanted to see what a Rock Shrimp looked like) and it tasted mostly of mayonnaise. I also had
A salad

A salad


and Key Lime pie ice cream.The Key Lime Pie ice cream was good.
Key Lime Pie Ice Cream

Key Lime Pie Ice Cream


Tomorrow we head for Fort Pierce

Posted by greatgrandmaR 12:13 Archived in USA Comments (0)

Down the Florida Atlantic Coast and Up to the Panhandle

Heading down to Key West for a Reunion and then Going up the Gulf Coast to Alabama


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2011 Back to Back Enchantment of the Seas and Lighthousing Driving South & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Tuesday 22 February 2011

We left St. Mary's GA (after I looked again for a cemetery that was on the map - but I couldn't find it). We were on our way to Fort Pierce.
Highways Air Patrolled

Highways Air Patrolled

Rest stop

Rest stop


We stopped in TItusville
Door of the marina office

Door of the marina office


and drove down to the marina - no CSYs there, and all the docks are now fixed docks except one of them. Met and talked to a lady who had a kidney transplant. She said before she had it, doing the dialysis from the boat was difficult.
Statue facing the anchorage - apparently holding Green 5

Statue facing the anchorage - apparently holding Green 5


We drove through the Titusville historic district on the way out
Titusville historic district

Titusville historic district


x100_8709.JPGPritchard House

Pritchard House


but did not stop.

Then we had lunch at
Steve's Diner

Steve's Diner


Bob had a
Tuna sandwich and fries $5.50

Tuna sandwich and fries $5.50


and I had
Corned beef $5.50

Corned beef $5.50

Coconut cake

Coconut cake



We got to Fort Pierce and checked into the Hampton Inn and I tried to post the photos from the previous two days. We went down to the Harbortown Marina for dinner.
Restaurant entrance

Restaurant entrance

The Sign Boat

The Sign Boat


They had a $13.95 dinner which included an entree, veg, salad and dessert, but it was too much to eat, so we just had the regular menu. Bob had a
Dozen Raw Oysters $9.95

Dozen Raw Oysters $9.95

Peel and eat shrimp $9.95

Peel and eat shrimp $9.95


and I had
Coconut Shrimp $15.95

Coconut Shrimp $15.95


We both had
An ice cream parfait $3.00

An ice cream parfait $3.00


I took some photos of the sunset and the birds roosting in a tree.
100_8735.JPGBirds nesting at sunset

Birds nesting at sunset

Sunset

Sunset


We got gas on the way back to the hotel

Wednesday 23 February 2011

The breakfast wasn't that good at this Hampton Inn. We are on our way to spend a day in Miami with our grandchildren
Daughters front door

Daughters front door


We got down to our daughter's house a little after noon. After we got the computer hooked up to her network and posted some more photos, we 'helped' our granddaughter with her math homework and watched her soccer practice. We also saw our grandson umpire a game in the field.
Grandson umpiring

Grandson umpiring


Bob used his dog whisperer tactics to make Pepper their dog stop barking at him.
Pepper the dog

Pepper the dog


Our daughter invited David and Carol over for dinner as she knew David would not be free any of the other days we were there.

Thursday 24 February 2011

My sister (Barbara - hereafter referred to as Aunt B) had gotten a week at a condo and wanted us to join her. So we broke our visit to our daughter and grandchildren in Miami to spend a couple of days with them. The condo was on the 4th floor, but there was an elevator. It was near the airport and their unit looked out on the beach. In the interior courtyard, there were tennis courts and also a heated pool which none of us took advantage of. Aunt B and Uncle George had previously done part of the conch train tour, but her back started to hurt, so she didn't finish the tour. Uncle George turned in their rental car when we got there.

We drove down the Keys. I took a photo of the construction barrels that were named after Bob :)
Bob's barricades

Bob's barricades


We stopped for lunch in Marathon at Key's Fisheries. Keys Fisheries is a marina and a restaurant.
Bob walking in to Key's Fisheries

Bob walking in to Key's Fisheries


They have signs against feeding the birds or fish
Don't feed the fish or birds

Don't feed the fish or birds


Birds around the restaurant

Birds around the restaurant


but I am sure that the birds and fish can't read and they don't know that people are not to feed them
x100_8801.JPGPelicans

Pelicans

Tarpon

Tarpon


The birds and fish wouldn't be here if they were not being fed.
x100_8799.JPGPelican and tarpon

Pelican and tarpon


You give your order in at the window, and they call you to pick it up. The quirky thing about this restaurant is they ask you a question and you are called to pick up your food by the name you give in your answer. For instance - one time we went, they were asking for your favorite singer. If you listened to them call people, you'd have though Placido Domingo and Crystal Gayle were eating there. I was Freddie Mercury. You eat at wooden picnic tables outside. Bob had coconut shrimp, and I had a
Lobster roll

Lobster roll


and Key lime and coconut ice cream for dessert (two scoops were $3.50)

The weather was beautiful and warm, unlike our visit in January, although it was still windy. The north wind was bringing armadas of Portuguese Man of War jellyfish and washing them onto the beach.
Man of War

Man of War

xDSCF7236.JPGMan o War washed up on the beach

Man o War washed up on the beach

Beach sweeper

Beach sweeper


My sister had made dinner reservations at Seven Fish which was on Thomas Street. My map had Thomas Street and Thompson Street mixed up which annoyed Bob. But we eventually got there and Bob let us off and parked. There is VERY limited parking around the restaurant in Old Town
Reflections in the Seven Fish restaurant door

Reflections in the Seven Fish restaurant door


We stood around outside with the other patrons until the restaurant opened at 6. I'm sure you could not have gotten another person in there and if you wanted to eat there, you had to have a reservation. They had people sitting in front of one of the two exit doors. Bob also had some concerns about the ceiling beams which he said were sistered.

Bob had the
Shrimp salsa appetizer

Shrimp salsa appetizer


and I had the
Fresh fish entree (which was mahi)

Fresh fish entree (which was mahi)


Aunt B and Uncle George had the Sea Scallops over mashed potatoes, puree peas and spinach which were $29.00. Then we shared a piece of
Part of a strawberry whipped cream pie with chocolate graham crust ($9.50)

Part of a strawberry whipped cream pie with chocolate graham crust ($9.50)


which I didn't take a photo of it until we had partly eaten it.

We just drank water, although they had a wine menu

Friday 25 February 2011

Our plans were constantly changing to accommodate conditions. Our plan for the first day was for Bob to take Uncle George out to play golf early and then to eat a late breakfast at Blue Heaven and then tour Hemingway House. I haven't been since the 60s. First we went to see our old house on Patterson Avenue,
Then and Now

Then and Now


which we found without a problem as the church where the older two girls went to school was a good landmark. They have fenced the yard, replaced the jalousie windows and door, and removed the tree in the front yard.

We tried to find the other house that we lived in for two months in 1961, but didn't recognize it. It wasn't until afterward that I found that it would have been at Patterson and Fourth streets.

Then we went to try to find Blue Heaven, but my map had Thomas and Thompson streets reversed on it. When we got there. first we tried to go in the wrong door. When we found the gate,
Blue Heaven entrance gate

Blue Heaven entrance gate


it was very crowded with a long (1.5 hour) wait. So we sat down to wait. Uncle George went out to intercept Bob who was parking the car. Aunt B and I sat at the entrance and people watched.
Blue Heaven cat history

Blue Heaven cat history

Aunt B taking a photo of a cat

Aunt B taking a photo of a cat


Eventually she went down to where George and Bob were and they also registered at the La Crêperie. However Barbara noticed that people were not being seated there any faster than at Blue Heaven, so she crossed our names off their list when we got seating at Blue Heaven.
Front of the menu

Front of the menu

IMG_0121.JPGBlue Heaven chickens

Blue Heaven chickens


Bob got banana bread and bacon. I got a fruit smoothie and a
Lobster Omelet

Lobster Omelet


which was the special. Aunt B and Uncle G got the
Lobster eggs benedict

Lobster eggs benedict


Bob had observed that there were many cruise people in town and that the line for Hemingway house was around the block, so we scrapped that plan and went to the East Martello Museum instead.
Fire Department Bell - 1887 gift outside the Martello Tower

Fire Department Bell - 1887 gift outside the Martello Tower


First we looked at the Mario Sanchez pictures which are in the 'basement. Mario Sanchez was born on Duval Street (1211 Duval) on October 7, 1908, of Cuban descent - the son of a cigar maker. As a self-taught artist he began carving and painting in 1930.
Fabulous-industry (Cigar making)

Fabulous-industry (Cigar making)


Mario did his bas relief wood sculpture with three chisels and his painting with dime store brushes. He mixed his own paints.
Key West funeral

Key West funeral


All of the things that appear in his work are accurate - if he shows a person, it is an actual person who lived. If there is a sign, it was an actual sign.
Hemingway House

Hemingway House


Then we went around the rest of the museum. The Martello Forts (along with Fort Taylor) were part of the defense for Key West. They never saw combat. Today, however, it serves as a museum with historical exhibits of the 19th to 20th century. Among the latter are relics of the U.S.S. Maine, and a Cuban refugee raft. Artifacts in the collection have began to reflect Key West’s early cigar manufacturing, salvaging, sponging, and turtling industries. Photographs, documents, and artifacts of writers who lived in Key West were added to the collection, including items relating to Elizabeth Bishop, James Merrill, Thelma Strabel, Benedict Thielen, David Kaufelt, Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, John Hersey, Richard Wilbur, John Ciardi and many others
Truman and Margaret intersection

Truman and Margaret intersection

Bakery

Bakery

Dollhouse

Dollhouse


Anderson Mitchell gravestone

Anderson Mitchell gravestone


There were some exhibits that I don't remember seeing before - there was one about a creepy guy who had a crush on a younger woman and after she died he was convinced that he could bring her back to life. They lived together as man and corpse from 1931 when she died until 1940
Diorama at the museum

Diorama at the museum

Beginning of the Obsessive love story

Beginning of the Obsessive love story


Undying love - part 2

Undying love - part 2


Playhouse outside the museum

Playhouse outside the museum

We went back to the condo - I tried to sign onto the wi-fi, but could not do it. Even with the correct passwords etc, the wi-fi would not recognize me. So I had to use Aunt B's computer when she wasn't using it.

We went to Mallory Square for the sunset celebration. Instead of going to the city parking lot, we parked at a $15 for all evening lot,
xDSCF7298.JPGBob paying for the parking and Me walking past the direction sign

Bob paying for the parking and Me walking past the direction sign

DSCF7304.JPGSponge Man and Truck

Sponge Man and Truck

Conch shells for sale

Conch shells for sale

Airplane

Airplane


and walked over. I sat down near the sword swallower, while Aunt B, Uncle G and Bob wandered around.
Slackwire performer

Slackwire performer

Tarot card reader

Tarot card reader


The cat trainer wasn't there and neither were any of the statute people.
x100_8880.JPGSunset watchers

Sunset watchers


It was also a cloudless day so not as good a sunset as usual.
Sunset

Sunset

100_8878.JPGSunset

Sunset


We had no plan for dinner, but Aunt B had seen Two Friends restaurant mentioned in the AAA book
Inside the restaurant

Inside the restaurant


and since that was right next to the parking lot, we ate dinner there. I had
Conch fritters

Conch fritters


and gave Aunt B one to taste, and a
Bacon cheeseburger

Bacon cheeseburger


Bob had
Half pound of Shrimp

Half pound of Shrimp


Chicken tenders

Chicken tenders


Aunt B and Uncle G had the
Lobster

Lobster



Saturday 26 February 2011

Aunt B went out to walk on the beach
Morning on the beach

Morning on the beach

Morning on the beach

Morning on the beach


and threw her back out. But about 8:30 we inserted her into the car and Bob drove us to Hemingway's house. He didn't go in as he said he had seen it.

n 1851, Asa Tift, a marine architect and salvage wrecker built the house. It was bought for Pauline and Ernest Hemingway by Pauline's rich uncle Gus in 1931. Pauline was Ernest's 2nd wife. When she divorced him in 1939, Hemingway moved to Cuba. Pauline died in 1951. Only Patrick, one of her two sons is still living.

Hemingway had a lot of friends in Key West, and many of them appeared as characters in his novel "To Have and Have Not" which is about Key West during the depression. Hemingway built the brick wall around the house in an effort to get some privacy from the crowds of tourists peering in through the fence
Hemingway House sign

Hemingway House sign


We had to wait about 20 minutes for the next tour, so Aunt B went into the shop, and I did too but didn't buy anything.

Aunt B and I took a photo of the same cat's foot - she took the pad side and I took the top side.
x100_8917.JPGBottom of cat's paw

Bottom of cat's paw


Cat house

Cat house

large_100_8918.JPG
The original a white cat (named Snowball) was given to the family by a sea captain. Some of the cats at the Hemingway house are descended from Snowball. Hemingway named all of his cats after famous people and that tradition has continued
1b9ed350-db7d-11ea-a41b-297e3c400668.JPGCat by the pool

Cat by the pool

1ad96070-db7d-11ea-ba6b-a702d6771bb2.JPGHemingway's cat

Hemingway's cat


One of the things that Hemingway did for the cats was to give them water to drink which was in a kind of tough. The top of the fountain is an old Spanish olive jar that he brought from Cuba and the trough below was one of the bar's urinals that was given to Hemingway by his friend Joe Russell when Joe moved his bar across the street due to a dispute over money. Pauline hated it and added the decorative tile to disguise it.
Urinal cat fountain

Urinal cat fountain


The tour was very interesting. Photos were allowed. Things were more or less the same as they were the first time.
100_8920.JPGIn Hemingway's house

In Hemingway's house

100_8923.JPGHemingway's bathroom

Hemingway's bathroom

Birthing chair that Hemingway carried around with him

Birthing chair that Hemingway carried around with him


Portrait of Hemingway

Portrait of Hemingway


They still told the story about the pool. (The pool story is: The house has the first pool in Key West - it cost $20,000 in the late 30s and the construction costs once prompted Hemingway to take a penny from his pocket, press it into the wet cement of the surrounding patio, and announce jokingly, "Here, take the last penny I've got!")
Hemingway's pool

Hemingway's pool


(I didn't know that Pauline replaced all the ceiling fans with a collection of chandeliers)
Chandelier

Chandelier


and this time I got some photos.
Nanny's bathroom

Nanny's bathroom


Looking down from Hemingway's study

Looking down from Hemingway's study


My sister went up into the studio - I didn't want to climb the steps
Hemingway's study

Hemingway's study

Hemingway's typewriter

Hemingway's typewriter


Lighthouse from Hemingway's house

Lighthouse from Hemingway's house


I took a picture of the lighthouse from the balcony (Hemingway used to complain that the lighthouse keeper could see into his bedroom) and
Cat cemetery

Cat cemetery


afterward I went to the cat cemetery and took a couple of photos. You may know that Willard Scott is still alive, so seeing his name listed might be a shock. Until you remember that this was a cat, and not the weatherman.
List of deceased cats

List of deceased cats


We then drove down to the Key West historic marina area and had lunch at the Turtle Kraal restaurant. When we lived in Key West in the 60s, this marina was full of shrimp boats and this was also where the turtle kraals were. The turtle kraals had a tower so that someone could get up high and see how many turtles were there.
Dingy dock from Turtle Kraals restaurant

Dingy dock from Turtle Kraals restaurant


I was astonished to find that the tower is no longer there having been toppled by a hurricane. I had the
Chicken tortilla soup

Chicken tortilla soup


and Aunt B had the
TK Signature Salad

TK Signature Salad


which had beef brisket in it. I think Uncle G had the
Fish tacos

Fish tacos


and I had a
BBQ sandwich

BBQ sandwich

Bob and George eating lunch

Bob and George eating lunch


Bob had
Raw Oysters

Raw Oysters


Uncle G saw the oysters were good and so he had some too.
Oysters sign in the Turtle Kraal Restaurant

Oysters sign in the Turtle Kraal Restaurant


Then we were too full for dessert, so we went over to the turtle museum. This now has a fee to enter. Aunt B said to the man at the museum that we had lived there, and he misunderstood and tried to let us in for $2.00 the local rate instead of $3.00 for everyone else and Bob didn't want him to do that, so the upshot was that none of us paid.
Turtle Kraals in front of the Turtle Museum

Turtle Kraals in front of the Turtle Museum

Turtle Museum

Turtle Museum

Turtle shell at the Turtle Museum

Turtle shell at the Turtle Museum


Turtle Kraals explanation

Turtle Kraals explanation

Uncle George talking to the museum man behind a big kettle

Uncle George talking to the museum man behind a big kettle

Green Turtle Industry Facing Extinction

Green Turtle Industry Facing Extinction

Turtle bones

Turtle bones


We looked around and talked to the guy and he got out his dulcimers and played them and he told us his life story. He said he was trying to get a novel published, so Aunt B said she knew a good agent and gave him her card and told him to email her. Then after he took our pictures,
Our photo

Our photo


we went back to the Turtle Kraal restaurant and had Key Lime pie because Aunt B said she hadn't had any yet.
Key Lime pie

Key Lime pie


We got the car out of the parking lot (this time we actually parked in the Key West City lot) and went back to the condo for Aunt B to lie on the floor and rest her back. We saw a wedding on the beach from the condo balcony.
Wedding on the beach

Wedding on the beach


For our last dinner we decided to try and find the Rusty Anchor Restaurant on Stock Island which we tried to find twice before when we had our boat at the marina on Stock Island, and failed both times - it was dark and we just couldn't see it where people said it was located.

Aunt B called for directions, and we tried to follow them. But even in the light the directions she got made no sense. So we just kind of bumbled around until we got there.
Rusty Anchor sign

Rusty Anchor sign


It turned out to be a good choice.
Inside

Inside


I had the
Mahi fish of the day with rice and beans

Mahi fish of the day with rice and beans


Aunt B decided to try conch (not realizing that it would be fried), and Bob and Uncle George had the
Stone crab claws

Stone crab claws


Uncle George had the large and Bob had the medium. They came cracked but with no additional eating tools other than the ordinary knife, fork and spoon. Then at the end Aunt Barbara had their Key Lime pie which she said was very good.. I had the ice cream.
Ice Cream

Ice Cream


The next morning we drove back to Miami

Sunday 27 February 2011

We left Key West early because we had to get to Miami by noon to see our granddaughter's soccer game with our daughter.

We thought they might have done away with the Big Pine Swap Meet, but that is apparently still operating. There was also a big Nautical Flea Market in Tavernier which held up traffic for a bit.
Flea market in Tavernier

Flea market in Tavernier


We ate lunch at Arbys.
Arby's supports the Car Show

Arby's supports the Car Show


Bob had the
Regular Roast beef

Regular Roast beef


and I had a
Bacon Cheese Croissant

Bacon Cheese Croissant


croissant.

We checked into the motel early and they didn't have the room clean yet so we had to wait.

Our granddaughter had a soccer game which was originally scheduled for 1:00 but it was rescheduled for Boca later in the afternoon.
White cat

White cat


When we got up to Boca and sat at the end of our team people right next the other team. The other team had beaten our granddaughter's team pretty decisively in a previous game,
Team meeting

Team meeting

Soccer

Soccer

Injured player

Injured player

Granddaughter as goalie

Granddaughter as goalie


but this time, the team all worked together and they won their first game of the season. I think the other team was in shock.
At the end of the game

At the end of the game


Monday 28 February 2011

Our daughter was off work. I tried to catch up with posting all the photos from Key West when I could not log on.

In the afternoon, we went to where our grandson was umping behind the plate and watched.
Grandson umping behind the plate

Grandson umping behind the plate


One of the ladies had a spread of crackers and cheese there, and our granddaughter and a soccer friend ate quite a bit of it even though it wasn't their team. Then she went to soccer practice
Granddaughter with the ball

Granddaughter with the ball


and I took some short videos of the goalie drills they were doing
Goalie practice

Goalie practice


We had dinner at our daughter's house.

We got a call from Aunt B that she and Uncle George might take a bump and end up in Miami. My daughter invited them to stay with her, but it turned out that they all got on the plane.

Tuesday 1 March 2011

Our grandson was umping a game and we met him at the Cheesecake Factory.
Bread

Bread


We had
Fried mac and cheese

Fried mac and cheese


fried mac and cheese as an appetizer and our daughter had a salad that you make roll-ups out of the ingredients.
Steak

Steak

Hamburgers

Hamburgers


We ordered a steak for our grandson. It was supposed to be an advance birthday dinner for Bob, but he snagged the check and paid it in cash so I don't know what everyone else had exactly. I had eaten too much to eat dessert so I got a Key Lime cheesecake to take home.
Cat looking at Bob

Cat looking at Bob

Cat helping Bob with the map

Cat helping Bob with the map

Pepper and Salt with Bob

Pepper and Salt with Bob

Wednesday 2 March 2011

We left early for the Florida west coast.
On the road - GPS keeps trying to get us to get on the Florida Turnpike

On the road - GPS keeps trying to get us to get on the Florida Turnpike

100_9135.JPGCorner of Krome Ave.

Corner of Krome Ave.


We were headed for Corkscrew Swamp. We started west and were on the Tamiami Trail before 8 am. After we passed the
Indian casino

Indian casino


and the road construction, we basically had the road to ourselves except for the odd airboat tow.
Airboat ahead of us

Airboat ahead of us

10:00 - empty road

10:00 - empty road

Panther crossing sign (we didn't see any)

Panther crossing sign (we didn't see any)

We got to the Corkscrew Swamp about 10:30.
x100_9147.JPGCorkscrew Swamp sign 2011 and 1967

Corkscrew Swamp sign 2011 and 1967


Our first visit in 1967 was only 13 years after it was founded. As I got there, I sort of remembered that when we were there before we got there late in the day and we decided that it cost too much and didn't go. But I found photos that showed that we all went in and did the boardwalk.
Bob and daughter on the boardwalk

Bob and daughter on the boardwalk


And I could even show Bob that he was there too - he didn't remember it. Sometimes when he doesn't remember things it is because he didn't go with us, but this time he was there.
Planning your visit

Planning your visit


In 2011, the parking lot was quite confusing and we in parked in the bus lot - farther away than would have been necessary. When we left, Bob went and got the car and brought it to the entrance. The price was a lot higher now than it was in the 60s

There was a wood stork sculpture outside the main building - wood storks are considered the canaries of the swamp, but they are really ugly birds IMHO.
779befb0-dc1a-11ea-8af8-4b582dbea895.JPGWood stork sculpture and detail

Wood stork sculpture and detail


Alligator in an aquarium in the visitor's center

Alligator in an aquarium in the visitor's center


We got a wheelchair for me, and Bob pushed
Rules

Rules


and we went all around the whole boardwalk - 2.25 miles.
Bob's photo of the boardwalk

Bob's photo of the boardwalk


Bob took lots of pictures.
Slash pine

Slash pine

Please approach quietly

Please approach quietly

Hardwood hammock

Hardwood hammock

Air plants

Air plants

Lichens

Lichens


We saw some iris and they called them 'blue flags' When I asked afterwards that was all that they knew as the name - I think they were I. Heigonia.
100_9160.JPGI. Heigonia

I. Heigonia


There were people waiting to see a painted bunting come back to the nest, and we waited awhile to but left without seeing one. Some of the rangers had telescopes trained on where the birds were and we could look through one and see the bird.
Ranger's scope

Ranger's scope


We saw a caterpillar and also a butterfly. I got a photo of the caterpillar
Caterpillar

Caterpillar


which was about my eye level in the wheelchair, but the butterfly escaped from the pixels.
Wet Prairie

Wet Prairie

White ibis

White ibis

Bald Cypress

Bald Cypress

Swamp water

Swamp water

Reflections

Reflections

Anhinga

Anhinga


We saw a small lizard, a white ibises, a limpkin, an anhinga, a great white heron and several night herons.
Small lizard

Small lizard

Night heron

Night heron

Limpkin

Limpkin

Dahoon holly

Dahoon holly

Pooh Tree

Pooh Tree

Great white heron

Great white heron

Anhinga

Anhinga



By the time we got back it was almost 1300, so we decided to have lunch in the little lunch place.
Grilled Chicken Club

Grilled Chicken Club


We got the grilled chicken club but ( could not get the microwave to work. Bob did microwave his.

Afterward I went to the bathroom and there was a sign that said "Yes we know our water is brown - it's OK"
Sign in bathroom

Sign in bathroom

After we left here, we went to Estero State Park.
Entrance

Entrance

Historic marker

Historic marker

Map of the site

Map of the site


I remembered this as the place where the FLAT earth people were (the Koreshans). But I remembered wrong. I thought I saw a presentation where they thought that the sky was like the inside of an orange. But what they really thought was that people lived on the INSIDE of a round ball (a HOLLOW earth society - a concave surface rather than a convex surface) and the sun and moon, and planets shown through holes in a rotating sphere more inside the ball kind of like they do the heavens and stars in a planetarium today.
Koreshan Premise

Koreshan Premise


They 'proved' this to their satisfaction by going out on the beach in Ft. Myers and measuring off a length along the beach and showing that the land was concave. (A straight line extended at right angles from a perpendicular post will meet the surface of the earth at a distance proportionate to the height of the perpendicular).
Earth not Convex

Earth not Convex


We would have visited in the late 1960s, and the site was still really owned by the Koreshans who were some of them still living so not all the exhibits that are there now were there then. I can't find any photos of what we saw then.
Bathrooms behind the Art Hall

Bathrooms behind the Art Hall

Art Hall

Art Hall


We went into the Art Hall where a docent gave us a tour and showed us the model that they had made of the earth, sun and planets to show how
their concept worked.
Model of the earth

Model of the earth


There was also art by various people and a piano which had only 85 keys. We were told that 6 of these were made in honor of some anniversary and this was the only one that is left, but I find on looking it up that older pianos often only had 85 keys.
Alchemy symbol

Alchemy symbol

Bob walking out of the Art Hall

Bob walking out of the Art Hall


Flowering tree

Flowering tree


After we left the Art Hall, we walked over to the Founder's house
Bob walking up to the Founder's house

Bob walking up to the Founder's house

Founder's house plaque

Founder's house plaque


and saw the film.
Part of the film

Part of the film


Dr Cyrus Teed who started the Koresh community was an alchemist. (Koresh is the Hebrew for Cyrus) In the autumn of 1869, during an experiment he was badly shocked, and passed out. During his period of unconsciousness, Teed believed he was visited by a divine spirit who told him that he was the messiah. He believed that he was immortal. He founded "New Jerusalem" in 1894 and seven women (representing the seven planets that were known at that time) ruled the colony.
Founder's house

Founder's house

Founder's house

Founder's house


The colony was very successful in various business ventures, but when Dr Teed went into politics, he got into an argument and was severely pistol whipped and later died of his injuries. He died on December 22nd (winter solstice). His followers were positive that he would be re-incarnated on December 25th, but when this did not happen the county medical examiner made them bury him. The tomb was later washed away in the 1910 hurricane.
Picture of the tomb before it washed out to sea

Picture of the tomb before it washed out to sea


Bob went down to the boat landing,
Dock

Dock


100_7150.JPG100_9208.JPGlarge_x100_9210.JPG
and I walked over to the Planetary Court where the 7 women lived.
Planetary Court

Planetary Court

People who lived in the Planetary Court

People who lived in the Planetary Court

Room in the Planetary Court

Room in the Planetary Court


8ed4bb50-dc1d-11ea-af93-43c97e6aa868.JPGRoom in the Planetary Court

Room in the Planetary Court

large_x100_9212.JPG
After we visited that, we checked into the Hampton Inn.
x100_9216.JPGHampton Inn

Hampton Inn


We had a non-smoking room with 2 queen-size beds, a comfortable work desk and rolling desk chair with adjustable height. The bathroom had a tub & shower combo and a curved shower rod that allows more light and space in the shower. There was a 25 inch color television, an alarm clock/radio, personal coffee maker, iron and ironing board, hairdryer, luggage rack, microwave and refrigerator. We used the coffee maker to make cocoa as we don't drink coffee. I logged on to the internet without a problem
Towel animal on side of bathtub to hold soap

Towel animal on side of bathtub to hold soap


We went to Perkins for dinner.
x100_9222.JPGBob walking in to Perkins

Bob walking in to Perkins

Perkins Pie case

Perkins Pie case

100_9229.JPGFish and chip dippers $8.19 and Senior Roast Beef Dinner $9.98

Fish and chip dippers $8.19 and Senior Roast Beef Dinner $9.98

Brownie Sundae Supreme $3.99

Brownie Sundae Supreme $3.99

Thursday 3 March 2011

The computer room at the Hampton Inn where there was a printer was in use, so the girls at the desk printed out the whole web page of the
lighthouses on the west coast of Florida for me - it was about 11 pages. There were 27 lighthouse on the list. We had seen two of them, and some were only accessible by boat, but I thought we could try to see some of the others.

After breakfast we decided to go to Sanibel Island and look at that lighthouse. We had been to Sanibel in the 60s but don't remember that we saw the lighthouse then. We just stayed at a motel by the beach and looked for shells.
Sanibel Island motel 1967

Sanibel Island motel 1967


The bridge over was a toll bridge,
be9ae970-dc4c-11ea-b644-3d6e84e9b3d0.JPGBridge to Sanibel Island - Toll $6.00

Bridge to Sanibel Island - Toll $6.00


but they did take cash.
Houses on the island from the causeway

Houses on the island from the causeway


You can see the lighthouse from the bridges.
Bob was driving

Bob was driving

Sanibel lighthouse

Sanibel lighthouse

On the island we saw signs "Gopher Tortoise Crossing". But we only saw the sign - no tortoises - Giant or otherwise
Gopher Tortoise crossing

Gopher Tortoise crossing


The lighthouse was in a park where there was a $2.00/hour parking fee.
Parking kiosk at lighthouse

Parking kiosk at lighthouse


So Bob waited in the car and I walked down to the lighthouse.
Road to the lighthouse

Road to the lighthouse


Sanibel lighthouse is a square pyramidal skeletal tower with central cylinder, painted brown; Tidelands 300 mm lens This lighthouse was the first of a class of skeletal lighthouses built in many parts of the country.
x100_9243.JPGLighthouse and Keeper's house

Lighthouse and Keeper's house


It was quite windy and they were doing kite boarding on the beach and I took some photos of that
it was a windy day

it was a windy day

Wind surfer

Wind surfer


I walked up to the first informational board
Shells

Shells


and then walked through the underbrush to see if I could get a better angle. got some good photos including some with birds flying around the top of the lighthouse.
Sanibel Lighthouse

Sanibel Lighthouse

Sanibel Island lighthouse with a buzzard

Sanibel Island lighthouse with a buzzard


I also got a photo of a songbird.
Bird

Bird


On the bridge back to the mainland

On the bridge back to the mainland


After we got back to the mainland, we got gas.

The first lighthouses on the list that I thought we could see were around the Tampa/St Pete harbor. Since we had already seen Boca Grande, I decided to go up the east side and try Port Manatee. I could see this on the map, but some of what I read made me think we would have trouble getting in to the port.
Water tower

Water tower

Entrance to Port Manatee

Entrance to Port Manatee


And we did. We got to the port and I went in to where all the truck drivers were waiting and they asked me if I had some kind of Federal Permit that allowed me to go onto the port, and of course I did not. The man I was talking to took pity on me and showed me the map which had them on it and gave me the 2011 Official Directory.
Booklet

Booklet


We were able to see them from the road although not the range side of them.
Port Manatee Inbound Range Rear triangular skeletal tower, painted with red and white horizontal bands Approx. 187 ft continuous white light in the daytime, visible only on the range line.
Port Manatee InboundRange Rear

Port Manatee InboundRange Rear

100_9291.JPGPort Manatee lights from the booklet

Port Manatee lights from the booklet


Port Manatee Inbound Range Front Approx. 138 ft triangular skeletal tower, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Quick-flashing green light at night, continuous white light in the daytime, visible only on the range line.
Information on Port tours

Information on Port tours


What I thought was strange is that they give tours of the port two days a week - "bring your camera."

We ate lunch at Hardees.
Inside Hardees

Inside Hardees


Bob had a small hamburger and a chocolate shake and I had a
Junior Thick burger

Junior Thick burger


and an apple turnover. We got a senior discount.

The next ones on the list were the Big Bend ranges on the docks of the Mosaic Company. We saw the Mosaic Company sign and went in and took
pictures of those.

Big Bend East Range Front Approx. 100 ft (30 m) square skeletal tower. The tower also carries a rectangular daymark painted red with a white vertical stripe. This range guides vessels to the docks of the Mosaic Company, which ships phosphate, fertilizer, and other agricultural products. Located adjacent to a quay at Big Bend, on the east side of Tampa Bay between Gibsonton and Apollo Beach
Big Bend Ranges

Big Bend Ranges

Big Bend East Range Rear Approx. 100 ft (30 m) square skeletal tower. The tower, one of three identical radio or TV transmission towers, also carries a rectangular daymark painted red with a white vertical stripe. Located on the east side of US 41 near Pembroke Road
Big Bend East Range Rear

Big Bend East Range Rear


Then we skipped up to Wakulla County which is south of Tallahassee.
Flag on the highway

Flag on the highway

29 miles to the Best Western - US Route 98

29 miles to the Best Western - US Route 98


We stopped for the night at the Best Western which was recommended by someone on the Harbour Light Collector Forum.

We got there about dusk. The hotel was around a courtyard. The desk girl was Russian and very friendly. She told us to go around the end of the desk and turn left and then go through the door to the courtyard.
Courtyard

Courtyard


When Bob did this correctly, she mentioned that most people go the wrong way - thinking that there is a central corridor - there is not. You have to go into the courtyard to get to your room.

Our reservation said: Room Details: 2 Queen Beds, No Smoking, High Speed Internet Access, Microwave And Refrigerator, Coffee Maker, Iron And Ironing Board, Hairdryer, Full Breakfast

The bathroom had a nice way of avoiding the shower curtain dilemma - they pulled the shower curtain to the back of the tub so it wasn't all over the floor in the bathroom collecting mildew.
x100_9300.JPGBathroom

Bathroom


TNightstand with a divider

Nightstand with a divider

here was a small wall between the two nightstands. There was a clock radio on one of the nightstands.

We asked where a good place to eat was and the desk girl said she didn't know about mileage so she gave us the distance in time. She said seafood was in one direction and there were other restaurants towards Crawfordville. We ended up at Hamaknockers Bar-B-Q.
Restaurant sign

Restaurant sign

Hamaknockers BBQ menu

Hamaknockers BBQ menu


This was a small place with red and white checked oilcloth tablecloths and a deer head on the wall.
x100_9303.JPGInside restaurant

Inside restaurant


A teen age boy took our order and I think the cook was another teen. Bob had
Ribs

Ribs


and I had a
Pulled pork sandwich and sides

Pulled pork sandwich and sides


It was cheap and good

Friday 4 March 2011

The motel had a nice breakfast with waffles, toast, sweet rolls and bagels, cereal, fruit and various beverages
Breakfast

Breakfast


Today was a real good day - we saw all the lighthouses on my list in the Florida panhandle. First we had a nice breakfast with waffles, toast, sweet
rolls and bagels, cereal, fruit and various beverages. We drove down to the Saint Marks. The GPS ran out of road but the car still had road so we drove all the way down to the end.
"Warning - Alligator" sign

"Warning - Alligator" sign

Burned over area

Burned over area


There were fires burning in the brush. We were supposed to pay for a permit, but there was no one to ask if our Golden Age Passport would exempt us from paying the fee so we just assumed that it would.
Entrance gates

Entrance gates


The St Marks lighthouse was built in 1842.
St Mark's lighthouse at the end of the road

St Mark's lighthouse at the end of the road


The light is extinguished mid August through October and mid February through April
100_9321.JPGSt Marks

St Marks


so as not to interfere with bird migration. The 73 ft brick tower (which was extended from 65 ft in 1867) is attached to a 1-story brick keeper's house (1871).

The fresnel lens has been removed for display. The lighthouse is painted white, and the lantern black. This is the second oldest Florida lighthouse.
St Mark's LIghthouse built by Winslow Lewis

St Mark's LIghthouse built by Winslow Lewis


The Friends of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge works for restoration of the light station and has a web site for the lighthouse. The keeper's house is being restored as a visitor center. The Coast Guard spent $150,000 in 2000 to stabilize the station, and the wildlife refuge improved the road and parking facilities. In 2002 the leaky roof of the keeper's house was repaired.
St Marks

St Marks


In July 2005 Hurricane Dennis broke a window of the lantern, soaking the inside of the tower with rain water, and washed out part of the parking lot.
A Guiding Light - National Historic Landmark sign

A Guiding Light - National Historic Landmark sign

Observation Monitoring Well - WARNING DO NOT FILL

Observation Monitoring Well - WARNING DO NOT FILL


In June 2006 Congress passed an act transferring the lighthouse from the Coast Guard to the Fish and Wildlife Service; this allowed the Refuge Association to proceed with restoration plans. However, the transfer could not be completed until lead-contaminated soil around the lighthouse was removed.
100_9332.JPGSt Marks

St Marks


I have seen photos of the lighthouse reflected in the water and I tried very hard to find that place to photograph it from, without any luck
Path to the water

Path to the water


03265b90-ddc6-11ea-a949-7f8e84708286.JPGSt Marks, the photo I saw with water, and mine with no water

St Marks, the photo I saw with water, and mine with no water


I did get some photos.

Then we went back towards Crawfordville and I took some photos of the Lake Ellen church and cemetery
CEM46559872_130214196377.jpgChurch

Church

Cemetery

Cemetery


Next on the list was Crooked River which we found fairly easily.
Approaching Crooked River (Carrabelle)

Approaching Crooked River (Carrabelle)

The 115 foot tall Crooked River lighthouse was built in 1895. It is a square pyramidal skeletal tower with central cylinder; this configuration is called "Sanibel class".
Top of Crooked River

Top of Crooked River


The upper half is painted red and the lower half is white.
Crooked River

Crooked River


The original 4th order bivalve Henry Lepaute lens is on display at the Coast Guard Eighth District headquarters in New Orleans. The keeper's house was sold and relocated 2 miles (3 km) west. In the late 1990s the lighthouse was abandoned and deteriorating. It was inactive from 1995 to 2007. It is now privately maintained.
Crooked River Lighthouse

Crooked River Lighthouse


The Carrabelle Lighthouse Association was formed in 1999 to work for restoration of the station. In 2000, the City of Carrabelle secured ownership of the site and leased it to the association. The state granted $298,000 for engineering studies and the start of a restoration, which was carried out in 2007. The lighthouse was relit with its original light pattern in a ceremony on 8 December 2007.
Crooked River visitor's center with handicapped parking sign

Crooked River visitor's center with handicapped parking sign


A replica of the keeper's house is being completed to serve as a visitor center and museum. Weather permitting, you can climb the Crooked River Lighthouse on Saturdays and Sundays from 1:00 p.m. till 4:00p.m. The cost for climbing the lighthouse is $5.00 per person. All climbers must be 44 inches tall.

Located on the inland side of US 98 just west of Carrabelle Beach. There is parking provided next to the tower.
Parkland for the use of the General Public

Parkland for the use of the General Public


Then we searched out Cape Saint George.

This was a leaning lighthouse which eventually toppled and people have rebuilt it (much like they have done with Blackistone Lighthouse on St. Clements Island).
Cape St George lighthouse at the end of the road

Cape St George lighthouse at the end of the road


Welcome to St. George Lighthouse Park

Welcome to St. George Lighthouse Park


In order to aid the steam boats picking up cotton A lighthouse was constructed in 1833. The lighthouse stood seventy-five-feet tall and exhibited thirteen lamps.
Chart of Appalachian Bay and the two lighthouses

Chart of Appalachian Bay and the two lighthouses


The 1852 lighthouse originally stood over 500 yards from the Gulf, but by 1990 the beach erosion on the Gulf side of the island threatened the lighthouse. Hurricane Andrew removed most of the remaining buffer zone in 1992. The Coast Guard, realizing that the lighthouse might be lost, deactivated the light in 1994. Hurricane Opal struck in 1995.
Damage caused by Hurricane Opal caused the tower to lean

Damage caused by Hurricane Opal caused the tower to lean


The resulting tidal surge swept around the lighthouse, forcing it off its piling foundation. As the lighthouse settled into the sand, the circular staircase was torn from the interior walls, and the tower developed a pronounced lean.

All was relatively well until Hurricane Dennis struck the Florida Panhandle on July 10, 2005 as a Category 3 hurricane, but as no other hurricanes came close to Cape St. George Lighthouse, it seemed the tower would survive another hurricane season. However, on October 21, years of stress on the leaning tower apparently became too much, as the lighthouse toppled into the gulf at 11:45 a.m.
Photo of the St George's Island lighthouse broken on the sand

Photo of the St George's Island lighthouse broken on the sand

Piece of the old lighthouse

Piece of the old lighthouse


The St. George Lighthouse Association quickly launched an effort to salvage the remains of the lighthouse. Roughly six months after the tower toppled, excavation equipment was used to recover the pieces of the lighthouse and load them on a barge so they could be transported to Eastpoint, where a local radio station had provided a storage area.
Lighthouse pieces

Lighthouse pieces

Memorial walk

Memorial walk

Bottom of Cape St George

Bottom of Cape St George

Pooch docking

Pooch docking


Volunteers subsequently spent numerous hours cleaning the recovered bricks so they could eventually be used to reconstruct the lighthouse. Plans for the new tower were based on original drawings obtained from the National Archives in Washington, D.C., and ground was broken for the project on October 22, 2007.
On April 4, 2009, a dedication ceremony was held for the lighthouse with Neil Hurley as the keynote speaker.
Fees to climb - Adults $5.00

Fees to climb - Adults $5.00


Fees for climbing the Lighthouse are:Adults -- $5.00Youth under age 16 -- $3.00Under age 6 -- No Charge
Lighthouse keeper's house Cape St. George lighthouse

Lighthouse keeper's house Cape St. George lighthouse

Looking up

Looking up

Lighthouse door

Lighthouse door

Lantern room

Lantern room


Members of the St. George Lighthouse Association, Florida Lighthouse Association, and St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum-- No Charge

U.S. Military Personnel with ID -- No Charge

Please Note: You must be at least 40 inches tall to climb the Lighthouse.

They gave us a list of restaurants at the lighthouse, and I took a photo of it so that I would be able to identify places. The Blue Parrot write-up said "Fresh seafood, steak & chicken, burgers. Appetizers, sandwiches, soups, salads, oysters. Homemade desserts. Lunch specials, children's menus, Outside tiki bar."
Beach

Beach


It was on the beach.
Bob walking in

Bob walking in

Lunch on the deck

Lunch on the deck


The men's room sign said
Men's room sign

Men's room sign


and the ladies room sign said
Women's room sign

Women's room sign


This is not technically correct as Parrots and Parakeets are two different types of birds, but it was cute. Bob got a
Half pound of peel and eat shrimp for $8.99

Half pound of peel and eat shrimp for $8.99


and I had
Seafood Gumbo $4.99

Seafood Gumbo $4.99


Bread Pudding $4.99

Bread Pudding $4.99


Cape St George lighthouse

Cape St George lighthouse

Next we went to the Cape San Blas Light.
Cape San Blas sign

Cape San Blas sign


There are several lighthouses in the Port St. Joe area. One of them is the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The cape protrudes from the southernmost point of Florida’s Panhandle and resembles an L-shaped arm, similar to Massachusetts’ Cape Cod. Beach erosion claimed three earlier lighthouses in 1851, 1857, and 1882.
x100_9441.JPGCape San Blas Lighthouse

Cape San Blas Lighthouse


The present skeleton lighthouse has four iron legs that run the length of the tower and are tied together with a network of braces. The central column, which housed the spiral staircase, is different from most used at other lighthouses as it does not extend all the way to the ground. An external metal stairway was used to access the door to the tower. This was to keep the entrance to the tower above any waters that might encroach on the station. The bottom portion of the tower was also supported by four additional legs that extended midway up.
Cape San Blas Light

Cape San Blas Light


The lighthouse was relocated a little over a mile inland in 1918, but it is under attack by the sea again. The station was quite isolated, with a trip to the nearest settlement requiring a one-way trek of twenty-three miles. Keeper Ray Linton found "the lonely vigil and wide expanse of the Gulf too great a burden," and in 1832, he took his own life. Six years later, Keeper Marler, a 38-year-old father of four children, was attacked and stabbed in a workshop at the station. His six-year-old daughter discovered her father’s body, when she went to call him for the noon meal. The identity of the perpetrator was never discovered.
Sign about the restoration of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse

Sign about the restoration of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse


In 2000, the U.S. Air Force assumed control of the site and began working to stabilize and restore the buildings. Two keeper's houses, collapsing onto the beach early in 1999, were relocated and one was renovated. The other has now also been restored.
Cape San Blas buildings behind a fence

Cape San Blas buildings behind a fence


The original brick oil house also survives. The light may be in operation, but it does not appear on the current USCG Light List. The station is owned by the Air Force and leased to Gulf County and the St. Joseph Historical Society, and the society has opened it to the public.
Standing with our back to the lighthouse

Standing with our back to the lighthouse


On September 20, 2008, the tower was opened for guided tours. Site and tower open Wednesday through Saturday; tower open on Saturday or to groups by prior arrangement.

Interesting power lines

Interesting power lines


We went the wrong way after that and had to retrace our steps.

Joseph Point (Beacon Hill) Range Rear was established on the shore of St. Joseph Bay in 1836 the town of St. Joseph . But with no river feeding the bay, no economical way of transporting the timber and cotton from outlying areas to the bay existed. When two railroads were extended east from the city to connect with the Apalachicola River, the town of St. Joseph started to prosper.

Then, in 1841, a ship arrived in port and introduced yellow fever into the community. In just a matter of weeks, the population of the town was decimated. Two years later, a hurricane, accompanied by a high tidal surge, managed to destroy what remained of the city.

For over fifty years, St. Joseph was known as the “City of the Dead,” but eventually, the city of Port St. Joe would be established roughly two miles north of the site of St. Joseph. With renewed activity in the bay, it was felt that another lighthouse to mark its entrance was merited. The new lighthouse was constructed on the mainland at Beacon Hill, opposite the northern tip of the cape, where the St. Joseph Bay Lighthouse had stood. Rather than build a lofty conical tower, a lantern room was mounted on a square watch room atop a hipped-roof keeper’s dwelling.

The St. Joseph Point Lighthouse was equipped with a third-order Fresnel lens, and a second beacon was established 600 feet seaward of the lighthouse near the beach. Together, the beacons functioned as range lights, and the lighthouse was known as the St. Joseph Light Range Station or as the Beacon Hill Light. In 1960, the lighthouse was replaced by a light on a 78-foot iron tower, and the old dwelling was sold into private hands for $300. When it was being moved along Overstreet Highway, the lantern room was dropped and destroyed.

In 1979, the lighthouse was transported roughly twenty miles south to its new home on St. Joseph Bay. By then, the structure had become known as the traveling lighthouse. The current owners, have been working for years to renovate and restore the building. In April 2011 they completed their work by mounting a replica of the original lantern.
Fish camp sign

Fish camp sign


It is located on county road 30 next to Presnell’s Fish Camp, 2.2 mi (3.5 km) south of the intersection of U.S. 98, south of Port St. Joe.The St. Joseph Point (Beacon Hill) Range Rear was a little difficult to photograph because it was a private home with no trespassing signs.
x100_9460.JPGSt. Joseph Point (Beacon Hill) Range Rear

St. Joseph Point (Beacon Hill) Range Rear

Last on the list (because we'd already seen Pensacola) was St. Joseph Bay (Beacon Hill) Range Rear. It is on the original location of the St. Joseph Point lighthouse which is at St. Joe Beach in Beacon Hill, about 8 miles northwest of Port St. Joe.
x100_9466.JPGSt. Joseph Bay (Beacon Hill) Range Rear

St. Joseph Bay (Beacon Hill) Range Rear


This is a square skeletal tower which has a rectangular daymark colored red with a white vertical stripe.
Close-up of the range marker

Close-up of the range marker


Front range marker out in the water

Front range marker out in the water

Tyndall Air Force Base Visitor's Center sign

Tyndall Air Force Base Visitor's Center sign


At some point we went into the Central Time zone.
US flag, POW/MIA flag and Florida flag

US flag, POW/MIA flag and Florida flag


As we passed Pensacola, we saw the Blue Angels pictured on the bridges and overpasses, but did not get a photo. We approached Mobile - we were to stay on the other side. As previously mentioned, traffic was terrible.
Traffic going into the city

Traffic going into the city


We got to Mobile and there was a HUGE traffic back-up going into the city from the west on I-10. Then we ran into a similar back-up on the our side of the road west of Mobile going OUT of the city. Took us half an hour to go about 5 miles. Found the motel about dusk

I had to take a smoking room as nothing else was available. I tried several hotels before I found even that. I think part of the problem was Mardi Gras - big celebrations and parade in town. There were people all over the lobby of the hotel playing games etc. when we checked in.
Bathroom

Bathroom


I think this hotel is really not in Mobile but in the outlying suburb of Tillmans Corners in Mobile County, but I could not find a map with the city limits of Mobile on it (that I could see where the city limits were). The room STANK of cigarette smoke. My nightgown smelled of cigarettes the next night. They had ashtrays and matches even in the bathroom.
Ashtray and matches - this is a Smoking room

Ashtray and matches - this is a Smoking room


We left for dinner and found Dick Russell's BBQ. It was definitely a local establishment. I recognized the name from the AAA book.
Dick Russell's BBQ

Dick Russell's BBQ


They had red and white checked oilcloth covering the tables, and the staff was really hustling - they cleared the table and seated someone else right away as soon as people left. It was very popular and there were always people waiting for a table.
Airplane above us

Airplane above us


When I read the reviews they are definitely mixed. Many people hated it - the sign says "wait to be seated" but it is a small place and there's no obvious location to wait. Some people don't like that. And some people thought the food was awful, but I think that may be a cultural difference in how people want their BBQ.

Bob had the sandwich with the bun and fries.
Bob's French fries

Bob's French fries


He thought I had wanted fries too, so he shared his. . I had a BBQ chicken sandwich without the bread and had a biscuit instead.
For dessert he had an
Apple pie ala mode

Apple pie ala mode


I had a peach cobbler. It was delicious
Map on the placemat

Map on the placemat


Then we got totally lost and couldn't find our way back to the hotel. This was because we had wandered around in the dark going through parking lots trying to find a Mexican place that we saw the sign from the hotel but never could get to and finally using access roads along what I think was a previous I-20 exit. It was quite dark and a little rainy. I had left the GPS in the motel so we couldn't use that. But eventually we saw something we recognized and got back there.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 12:16 Archived in USA Tagged lighthouses key_west miami grandchildren mobile sanibel estero st_marks titusville corkscrew_swamp Comments (0)

(Entries 16 - 18 of 19) « Page 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 »